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Photo Scanner Experience?

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  • joeswann
    replied
    I have had good luck with Doxie scanners (https://www.getdoxie.com/). I wish they would improve their software interface a bit, but their hardware has been a good experience for me.

    I bought a Doxie Flip years ago. This is a battery powered scanner that scans to an SD card. It is also a flatbed scanner that scans up to 4x6 photos. I have, however, used the image stitching feature in their software to put together blueprints from a house. It was a bit tedious to scan all that in pieces, but I felt it wasn't worth a trip to find a large format scanner for one paper. Point it, this can be done.

    I recently lucked up on a used Doxie Q document scanner for cheap. It has also proven to be a good scanner. And I have discovered that if you have a box full of snapshots you can leave the document feeder lid closed and hand feed the prints through the scanner. Something to do with your hands while watching an Andy Griffith rerun.

    Anyway, these scanners meet the majority of my needs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob White
    replied
    Originally posted by Terry Smith View Post
    Re: Photo Scanner Experience?

    Bob White thanks much for alerting me to the Qroma solution. Wow! Talk about a "no boundaries" solution. I think a more conventional solution (which will take the flatbed route) is a better bet for the file types and archiving I have in mind. Meanwhile, I'll be watching for an IPO when that nifty Qroma system "makes it big."

    Terry
    Qroma is very tiny. Actually, last I knew, it is just Tony Knight working at home with some spousal support for things like doing the bookkeeping, etc.. I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for him to IPO. I see him operating much like Ed Hamrick with the VueScan scanner application or Thorsten Lemke with Graphic Converter. e.g. Doing a labor of love and making a living wage doing it. Beats the h^#* out of an 8 to 5 job with commuter traffic.

    By the way, I am, as time permits, working my way through lots of slides. Got my first SLR camera in the mid 1960's and, by the time that I bought my first Canon Digital Rebel in 2003, I had accumulated several thousand slides. After less than satisfying experiences with other brands of slide scanners, I picked up a Kodak Scanza going on two years ago. I am getting really good results with this one. It is currently about $160 on Amazon.

    Leave a comment:


  • kevinkovalsky
    replied
    Originally posted by Terry Smith View Post
    I want to update my very slow, 15+ year old flatbed scanner.

    My feedstock consists of several thousand prints now in the "shoebox" that have been accumulating for a long time. They've lasted this long, but . . .

    I want to scan to generate .tiff files, catalog them in LightRoom, and clean them up in LR or Photoshop. Reunion multimedia will be produced as .jpegs from the cleaned-up .tiffs. The .tiffs will be archived for my heirs and assigns.

    The scanner will _not_ be used to scan slides or negatives. I've had excellent results digitizing over 2900 slides using a DSLR fitted with a macro lens and minimal additional hardware. That project is completed. Negatives are a low priority for me at this point.

    Edit: I forgot to mention I'm also checking into setting up a copying stand to accomplish this project. If anyone has ideas on this approach, I'd certainly be interested in what you see as the pros and cons. Thanks.

    Both cost and ease/speed of use are important. Every hour spent on this project will be one hour I'd rather have spent on research and production of results.

    Thanks to any willing to share your experience and suggestions re: scanner hardware.

    Terry
    Hey friend, I work in restoration of old photos, just a small gig, nothing serious but I still need a good scanner to work with the photos, so I’ve been using an old scanner that did the job okay enough, but it took a lot of time per photo and I wasn’t making too much. Now, after I got a good budget photo scanner, I’m working a lot faster. My point is, if you need it, upgrade for sure, it is worth it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob White
    replied
    Re: Photo Scanner Experience?

    Another very good app for smart phones is Scanner App by Photomyne. It is available for both iOS and Android phones. More information at https://photomyne.com.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kim
    replied
    Re: Photo Scanner Experience?

    Originally posted by donworth View Post
    I use PhotoShop and it has a photo merge tool that I use for larger items. (PhotoShop Elements has the tool also.) I did a panorama of the Monterey Presidio taken in 1930 that was 3 feet long and 8 inches tall in several overlapping 600 dpi scans and the photo merge tool put them together perfectly in a matter of seconds. If you're interested you can see the end result here:

    http://www.bishir.org/misc/MonterreyReduced.jpg
    I would probably also use my scanner a do a photo merge for a large photo, but I was assuming we were talking about a document. At least for me, I don't worry about colors in a document the way I do with a photo, and Scanner Pro is much easier than trying to merge pages.

    Leave a comment:


  • gathompson56
    replied
    Re: Photo Scanner Experience?

    Originally posted by donworth View Post
    I use PhotoShop and it has a photo merge tool that I use for larger items. (PhotoShop Elements has the tool also.) I did a panorama of the Monterey Presidio taken in 1930 that was 3 feet long and 8 inches tall in several overlapping 600 dpi scans and the photo merge tool put them together perfectly in a matter of seconds. If you're interested you can see the end result here:

    http://www.bishir.org/misc/MonterreyReduced.jpg
    Nice job Don. I have Lightroom 6 which I think also builds panoramas, which I have yet to try.

    But my initial test of ScannerPro was very positive. It very quickly scans, allows for automatic or manual adjustments, and loads to iCloud or DropBox from which I can move to my directories on my hard drive.

    Leave a comment:


  • donworth
    replied
    Re: Photo Scanner Experience?

    W/re flatbed scanning of slides, I did a little comparison of a 1940s Kodachrome slide my dad had on a Wolverine dedicated slide scanner and my Epson V600. The difference was substantial. The Wolverine was about the same price as the Epson ($200) but the results from it were higher in contrast, oversaturated (my mom and dad look like Oompa Loompas), and the shadows were purple. The clarity of detail was better in the Epson as well. I would assume the results would be similar with JumbL and ION slide scanners. I have not copied any slides with a camera myself, but my guess is, if you eventually rescan some of the slides you copied with your lashed up camera method, you're going to see an improvement.

    Here's a side by side - my mom and dad at Balboa in 1947 right after they were married. (I was just a sparkle in my dad's eye at the time.)

    http://www.bishir.org/misc/WolverineVSEpson.jpg

    Don
    Attached Files
    Last edited by donworth; 13 August 2017, 01:51 PM. Reason: Insert missing words

    Leave a comment:


  • donworth
    replied
    Re: Photo Scanner Experience?

    I use PhotoShop and it has a photo merge tool that I use for larger items. (PhotoShop Elements has the tool also.) I did a panorama of the Monterey Presidio taken in 1930 that was 3 feet long and 8 inches tall in several overlapping 600 dpi scans and the photo merge tool put them together perfectly in a matter of seconds. If you're interested you can see the end result here:

    http://www.bishir.org/misc/MonterreyReduced.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • gathompson56
    replied
    Re: Photo Scanner Experience?

    Originally posted by Kim View Post
    You could do 2 scans and then use photo editing software to merge the scans. Or just keep it as 2 separate pages. Or just use a scanner app on your phone. I use Scanner Pro by Readdle.
    Thanks Kim. I am going to give Scanner Pro a try. The cut and paste methodology is just a little clunky.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kim
    replied
    Re: Photo Scanner Experience?

    Originally posted by gathompson56 View Post
    I have an Epson V500 Photo scanner and have just inherited a bunch of photos slides and documents. This will give me the chance to test the scanners capabilities especially with slides and negatives.

    Part of this collection are 8 1/2 X 14" legal documents. The scanner only goes up to 8 1/2" X 11.

    Any tricks on how to use the scanner to capture these legal size documents?
    You could do 2 scans and then use photo editing software to merge the scans. Or just keep it as 2 separate pages. Or just use a scanner app on your phone. I use Scanner Pro by Readdle.

    Leave a comment:


  • gathompson56
    replied
    Re: Photo Scanner Experience?

    I have an Epson V500 Photo scanner and have just inherited a bunch of photos slides and documents. This will give me the chance to test the scanners capabilities especially with slides and negatives.

    Part of this collection are 8 1/2 X 14" legal documents. The scanner only goes up to 8 1/2" X 11.

    Any tricks on how to use the scanner to capture these legal size documents?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bronte Gould
    replied
    Re: Photo Scanner Experience?

    Originally posted by Terry Smith View Post
    Good news for you. I've had my V600 for less than a week (meaning the accompanying disk full of software had the latest versions). The scanner is working with an aged iMac that runs OS X v. 10.6.8. The V600's scanning/copying functions are running without a hitch.
    Thank you for your response and useful information. Much appreciated.

    Leave a comment:


  • bringel
    replied
    Re: Photo Scanner Experience?

    I have been using the Epson V600 for several years now through several OS X upgrades and in my view, it is a capable and adequate scanner. Epson's support web site posts several versions of its application software for this scanner depending on your OS X version. My primary complaint is that the Epson software team is not very Mac proficient. It is quite klutzy compared to other professional Apple apps. I have used this scanner to copy several thousand slides, old B&W negatives and photos, documents and many color prints as well. I am very satisfied with the resulting images. I do wish there was a way to scan my library of old family large format glass plate negatives with this scanner.
    This scanner provides a 35mm slide mask that allows you to scan up to four slides in one pass which does save a little bit of time and effort.
    Last edited by bringel; 04 October 2016, 05:51 PM. Reason: Add a feature.

    Leave a comment:


  • Terry Smith
    replied
    Re: Photo Scanner Experience?

    Originally posted by Bronte Gould View Post
    Am considering purchasing a scanner capable of slide scanning. I note the Epson V600 has software included but this is not compatible with a Mac computer. How did you get around this as assume everyone using Reunion uses a Mac? Currently running 10.6.8 and hoping to upgrade to a new laptop within twelve months.
    Good news for you. I've had my V600 for less than a week (meaning the accompanying disk full of software had the latest versions). The scanner is working with an aged iMac that runs OS X v. 10.6.8. The V600's scanning/copying functions are running without a hitch.

    The disk says it runs with a variety of Windows installations and " . . . OS X 10.6.8 - 10.10.x" and includes (as listed on the disk): Epson Scan, ABBY FineReader, Arcsoft PhotoStudio, and Easy Photo Scan. I've only used Epson Scan since I either own or don't need the other three.

    I don't think you'll have a problem with compatibility. Consider keeping that "old" laptop as a dedicated Mac for your scanning project.

    For the benefit of followers of this thread: my decision to purchase resulted from the help and advice from forum members. The V600 has been extremely easy to use, and the image quality easily justifies its price. In a test session of a few hours, I scanned a variety of old prints, old negatives (color as well as B&W [35mm and 120]), and copied 70 year old slides that were precious -- although poorly exposed. In all cases, the resulting image files (all tiffs and of varying resolutions) have exceeded my expectations. I've used Epson Scan for the capture and Lightroom for clean-up and cataloging. Scanning an orange Kodacolor negative that's been knocking around for decades, its print (if any) lost forever, and seeing a sharp, crisp color image pop up on one's monitor is truly a kick!

    Until I run a side by side test of copying a slide of more recent vintage and high quality, I won't be able to say the scanner's end _slide_ product is on a par with images made from my former lash-up using a Nikon DSLR with an expensive macro lens, a tripod, and an assortment of ancillary gear. Nothing I've seen so far suggests the V600 won't be as good or exceed my results there. And, a big plus is the ease of use and speed I've seen. I won't be going back.

    The help received from forum members in getting to this point has been put to good use. Thanks very much to all who shared their experiences with me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bronte Gould
    replied
    Re: Photo Scanner Experience?

    Am considering purchasing a scanner capable of slide scanning. I note the Epson V600 has software included but this is not compatible with a Mac computer. How did you get around this as assume everyone using Reunion uses a Mac? Currently running 10.6.8 and hoping to upgrade to a new laptop within twelve months.

    Leave a comment:

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