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Geoff Tani
03 February 2006, 08:08 AM
May I ask for people's advice or comments about handling duplicate photograph scans?

I have a collection of about 1000 image scans I am organizing. The images are old family photographs, which I originally shot on 35mm film (in the pre-digital camera days) and recently scanned.

There are lots of duplicates. In some cases, I took multiple shots of the same photograph. In other cases, the same same photograph existed in different relatives' collections. And in many cases, I shot the front and the back of the photograph, because the backs contained valuable captions. The net result is that for many images I might have 4, 5, even 10 duplicate shots.

Since I scanned every frame, I have lots of scans of duplicate photographs. I made a FileMaker database and defined a relationship to link duplicate images together. For each set of duplicate images, I select one that is the best and display that one in a container field, and the others in a portal.

I guess this system is good enough. But there are many images for which I have duplicates that seem useless, because they just are not the best scan of the image. If I'm never going to use these images, why do I have them? They just take up space and add complexity. But, for now, I've kept all the images -- dupes included -- partly because they go back to film, and it might cause more confusion if I have an incomplete scan collection; and partly because of a feeling of "just in case."

It seems like there is a better, more elegant way to handle all these duplicates.

How did you organize your photograph scans, including duplicates?
Is it worth it to keep all the scans, or select just one and delete the rest?
How did you link duplicate scans together?

Sue Phillips
03 February 2006, 02:08 PM
Dick Eastman posted a similar kind of question to his newsletter a week or so ago. You may want to read through this article and comments.

http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2006/01/file_naming_con.html#more

As to the duplicates, I would concentrate on making regular back-ups, but keep only the best image our of each set of duplicates.

Bill McQuary
03 February 2006, 06:39 PM
How did you organize your photograph scans, including duplicates?
Is it worth it to keep all the scans, or select just one and delete the rest?
How did you link duplicate scans together?Geoff,

Why not give Adobe Lighthouse a try? The software, in a final edition, will compete with Apple's Aperture ($499). However, Lighthouse is still an beta (development) so Mac users can get a copy for free. (Part of the fun is that PC users can't get a free copy.)

Go to this link:

http://labs.macromedia.com/technologies/lightroom/

Be sure to watch the Video: General Overview of Lightroom Beta 1 Features. It shows how the software can be used to select the best of various batches of similar shots and organize them all for quick retrieval.

Regards,
Bill

nanajoan
04 February 2006, 11:19 AM
May I ask for people's advice or comments about handling duplicate photograph scans?...If you are using Mac OSX, you have iPhoto, which allows you to easily edit and organize your photos. You can then copy those images you want to include in Reunion.
Nanajoan

STEVE
04 February 2006, 11:22 PM
May I ask for people's advice or comments about handling duplicate photograph scans?

...snip...

How did you organize your photograph scans, including duplicates?
Is it worth it to keep all the scans, or select just one and delete the rest?
How did you link duplicate scans together?

Hi Geoff,

I use a program called "iView" <http://www.iview-multimedia.com/>For this task. The photo's themselves are located on a dedicated disk in folders named for families (with folders inside for branches and/or individuals with multiple photographs) or events. For my main "directory" I drag and drop the hard drive icon (master folder) onto the iView icon. This causes the creation of a "catalogue" that shows an icon (size selectable 32x32-640x640) of each picture/sound file/movie/whatever. This catalogue is easily updated. Catalogue's can also be created for any subset.

Once in the catalogue, the program automatically shows whatever information may be attached --- that MAY include: media type, file type, encoding, file size, volume name, orientation, dimensions, resolution, depth, compression, color space color profile... and others as well as dates. As well as this automatic information YOU can attach such things as labels, make up sorting sets and subsets, Find and sortby dates, enter events, authors, locations, peoples names/descriptions, and keywords, annotations and notes.

You can create as many catalogues as you wish (i.e., have disk space for). I find this a truly useful (if pricey) tool, and it has some truly powerful features --- such as automatically finding duplicates.

About duplicates. I'm not a good one to ask about this. I still have bubble gum that I bought (and chewed) in third grade... ;-)

Hope this helps, STEVE