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Sarahjane
23 January 2006, 11:51 AM
At the meeting of my genealogy group yesterday, I was asked how to include someone's long-term partner (there is no marriage involved).

Obviously, I can include this person as the "spouse" of the family member, but is there an option in Reunion to clearly show that no marriage has taken place but these people are partners, rather than just leaving the impression that you don't have a marriage date?

Are there better options for tracking this person who is obviously part of the family, but not by blood or marriage?

In this particular case, I do not know if there are any children involved, but that is always a consideration (children of unmarried, but together parents)

Thanks for any help

Sara Hyman

theKiwi
23 January 2006, 12:23 PM
You can use the Status button on the Edit Family Card to choose "Unmarried" or "Common Law". This then shows in the marriage button on the Family Card.

Roger

Sarahjane
23 January 2006, 12:59 PM
You can use the Status button on the Edit Family Card to choose "Unmarried" or "Common Law". This then shows in the marriage button on the Family Card.Common Law is NOT an option - in my mind, that is a very specific legal condition
Unmarried would work, unmarried then shows up under the spouse in a tree forexample rather than a marriage date.

I'll pass this on to the person who asked me and keep it in mind if it ever becomes an issue within my own family.

Thanks for the help
Sara

AE Palmer
23 January 2006, 08:53 PM
Common Law is NOT an option - in my mind, that is a very specific legal condition
Unmarried would work, unmarried then shows up under the spouse in a tree forexample rather than a marriage date.Sara

If one wishes to make a citation for such a union as "Never Married," the process is to create the citation as if it were a standard marriage and THEN convert it over to indicate Never Married!

martha
24 January 2006, 02:35 AM
Common Law is NOT an option - in my mind, that is a very specific legal condition
Unmarried would work, unmarried then shows up under the spouse in a tree forexample rather than a marriage date.

I'll pass this on to the person who asked me and keep it in mind if it ever becomes an issue within my own family.Sara, you did say someone's "longterm partner" didn't you? According to what I understand the law to be, after x years, the number for x depending upon the local laws, the partner is then legally considered to be a "common law" spouse, independent of what they claim to be or not to be.

Martha [in Israel]

Joanna Ashmun
24 January 2006, 06:30 PM
Sara, you did say someone's "longterm partner" didn't you? According to what I understand the law to be, after x years, the number for x depending upon the local laws, the partner is then legally considered to be a "common law" spouse, independent of what they claim to be or not to be. In the USA, less than 1/3 of the states recognize common law marriage, and the different states have differing requirements.

Joanna

Betty Eichhorn
24 January 2006, 07:18 PM
Sara, you did say someone's "longterm partner" didn't you? According to what I understand the law to be, after x years, the number for x depending upon the local laws, the partner is then legally considered to be a "common law" spouse, independent of what they claim to be or not to be. Martha, I believe that common law marriages are no longer recognized in the U. S. and haven't been for several decades.

Betty.

mobang
24 January 2006, 07:39 PM
Sara, you did say someone's "longterm partner" didn't you? According to what I understand the law to be, after x years, the number for x depending upon the local laws, the partner is then legally considered to be a "common law" spouse, independent of what they claim to be or not to be. As has been pointed out, very few, if any, states in the US consider "common law marriages" to be legal unions. That notwithstanding, the term "common law" is still used rather frequently in the vernacular to describe a long-time-cohabiting-but-not-legally-married couple.


Mo!

David G. Kanter
24 January 2006, 08:03 PM
If one wishes to make a citation for such a union as "Never Married," the process is to create the citation as if it were a standard marriage and THEN convert it over to indicate Never Married!If one chooses to put a "significant other" on the Family Card

martha
26 January 2006, 01:19 AM
Martha, I believe that common law marriages are no longer recognized in the U. S. and haven't been for several decades. Whoops!!!! You mean my age is showing??? Thanks for the correction!

Martha

Teresa Delikat
26 January 2006, 07:43 PM
http://www.unmarried.org/common-law-marriage.html

This site gives the list of states that do recognize common law marriages. (15 states plus DC)

In most states that recognize common law marriages, there are no time requirements for living together. The controlling issue is not time together, but the intentions of the parties.

Some states such as Ohio have stopped recognizing common law marriages unless they were entered into in Ohio before October 10, l991. After that they are prohibited.

SVass
27 January 2006, 06:32 PM
At the meeting of my genealogy group yesterday, I was asked how to include someone's long-term partner (there is no marriage involved).Sara Hyman
Marriage is both a legal situation and a religious rite. Local laws apply to inheritance and taxes (and occasionally religious bigotry). Each religious sect may perform and recognize a marriage WITHOUT regard to local law. So there is no single definition. Genealogy requires us to make arbitrary decisions. Sam