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View Full Version : "Enhanced Image Viewer" at Ancestry.Com


Judith Morris
16 January 2006, 04:59 PM
Have other Reunion users of Ancestry.Com found any way around being unable to use the Enhanced Image Viewer for census images, OTHER than using a Windows operating system (either real or via Virtual PC) and Microsoft Explorer--which are the only systems on which Enhanced Image Viewer can be used?

When Ancestry supported the Mr.Sid image viewer, I was (more or less) happily able to pan around on a census image, at whatever zoom increment I preferred. But now that they no longer support Mr.Sid, and the only available option to Mac users is the Basic Image Viewer, once I zoom a census image large enough to be able to read it (in other words, anything larger than 50%), the census image is no longer fully in view, i.e., the entire right end of the page in 1910, 1920, etc. is missing and there's no way to pan across to see what it says.

I've asked Ancestry if they have any plan in the works to make Enhanced Image Viewer available for Mac, and they gave me a flat "No." Their overall support of Mac systems has been poor to non-existent in the 8-9 years I've been using Ancestry; their standard answer whenever I raise the issue is usually "Our developers are working on it" but nothing ever happens.

Aside from their lack of Mac-friendliness, my overall experience and success in using Ancestry has been quite good; but now that I can't even read an entire census image without going to Virtual PC, or a Windows machine, I'm chewing nails because I can't do any cutting & pasting or toggling back and forth to my Reunion data! Just wonder if any other Ancestry users have found a way around this problem.

Bob Goode
16 January 2006, 06:36 PM
I save the image to the hard drive and open the image in either Preview or Photoshop Elements. I can print a hard copy. If the image is to small then I print the top half of a census page, followed by the bottom half. Then they go into a clear plastic sleeve.

I am sure there other ways to arrive an acceptable solution and would welcome other suggestions.

I too have been frustrated with Ancestry.com with regards to the lack of concern about the Mac platform. I still subscribe but albeit reluctantly.

Bob

Kate McCain
16 January 2006, 07:39 PM
I save the image to the hard drive and open the image in either Preview or Photoshop Elements. I can print a hard copy. If the image is to small then I print the top half of a census page, followed by the bottom half. Then they go into a clear plastic sleeve.

I am sure there other ways to arrive an acceptable solution and would welcome other suggestions.

I too have been frustrated with Ancestry.com with regards to the lack of concern about the Mac platform. I still subscribe but albeit reluctantly.

Bob

I am running a fairly new iMac with system 10.3 whatever (the one just before Tiger). I found that, for some reason, the zoom feature wasn't working with IE and the census records. I switched to the current version of Netscape and haven't had any problems zooming or scrolling census images.

I save the images to my computer and open and trim/scale/print in GraphicConverter which is a program that every Mac user should know about. It takes ANY image format and can turn it into any other image format. You can make the image any size, capture part of it, print it, etc. (Grab will capture part of the image but it's not as simple to get it to print on a single page.)

Regards,

Kate McCain

WilliamTaber
16 January 2006, 08:21 PM
Have other Reunion users of Ancestry.Com found any way around being unable to use the Enhanced Image Viewer for census images, OTHER than using a Windows operating system (either real or via Virtual PC) and Microsoft Explorer--which are the only systems on which Enhanced Image Viewer can be used?

I use the Firefox browser and am able to pan the census image (using the scroll bars on the side and bottom) and zoom the image 50%, 100%, 150%, 200% using the menu provided by ancestry. Also, I am able to save the image (using the floppy disk icon on ancestry) to my hard drive and use the Mac's Preview appliction to view, pan, and zoom.

The one feature of the Enhanced Image Viewer I really miss not having on the Mac is while viewing newspaper archives on ancestry...the Enhanced Image Viewer will hilight the text that I have searched for, whereas the standard image viewer does not.

Rikki
16 January 2006, 09:06 PM
Have other Reunion users of Ancestry.Com found any way around being unable to use the Enhanced Image Viewer for census images...I found that with Ancestry Tech support and some time I was able to get a version of Mazilla which lets me open the census images.

Sarah Dart
17 January 2006, 01:27 AM
Have other Reunion users of Ancestry.Com found any way around being unable to use the Enhanced Image Viewer for census images, OTHER than using a Windows operating system (either real or via Virtual PC) and Microsoft Explorer--which are the only systems on which Enhanced Image Viewer can be used?I used to have the problem you describe, but Ancestry changed their system and for over a year now I have had no problem-- and I don't use the Enhanced Image Viewer (by the way, Mr. Sid never did work for me). I'm not quite sure why yours doesn't work, but I can describe what I now do and you can see if it is different on your screen. I'm on a PowerBook G4 laptop right now, running Safari.

I go to the census, search for the record I want, click on "view record" next to the name, then "view original image" under the little thumbnail of a census form. It then gives me the whole census page with blue scroll bars right and bottom that allow me to move freely around. If the writing on the page is too small (it has a default of 50% size) then change the size on the little menu in the upper left next to the magnifying glass. I usually change to 150% and all is well. This sounds like what William was talking about with Firefox, but I get the same result in Safari.
Sarah

gstaveley
17 January 2006, 03:14 PM
Have other Reunion users of Ancestry.Com found any way around being unable to use the Enhanced Image Viewer for census images...Yes, that is frustrating and troublesome. I trolled around and found a LizardTech djvu plug-in for Mac that seems to work. Also I have better results in Safari than Internet Explorer.

Gaylord

rnkiii
18 January 2006, 10:29 AM
I DLd the Lizard Tech Djvue plugin and installed it... but don't seem to see any 'improvement' in the viewing of the documents.
I know that the 'advanced viewer' for PCs requires some special X10/11 command processing capabilities that Macs do not support.

Gildell
18 January 2006, 01:26 PM
once I zoom a census image large enough to be able to read it (in other words, anything larger than 50%), the census image is no longer fully in view, i.e., the entire right end of the page in 1910, 1920, etc. is missing and there's no way to pan across to see what it says.

Just wonder if any other Ancestry users have found a way around this problem.

I use the same procedures as Sarah describes in her response (Safari) also on a Powerbook G4, running system OSX 10.4.4, and I have the scroll bars on the right and at the bottom that allow me to scroll around and see the entire message.

Judith Morris
19 January 2006, 02:32 PM
THANKS to all of you for your helpful replies. I tested each different approach, and found which works best for me...PROBLEM SOLVED best, using Firefox!

To summarize, in case anybody else can learn from the experience:
(First, I'm using a Mac G4 867 MHz PowerPC G4, with OSX 10.3.9 and, usually with Ancestry.Com, Netscape 7.1)

Per Bob and Kate's suggestions, I saved the census image to my hard drive and opened it, in turn, using Photoshop, then Graphic Converter. Don't know why (maybe because I was using Netscape?), but the image saved to the hard drive was only 1/2 of the image that should have been saved from the screen. I also used Grab (one of my favorite tools!) to capture the image, but when I tried to enlarge it to readable size the resolution was too poor to read.

Then I used the Firefox browser and this solved everything...thanks, William! It had been lurking here in my applications mostly unused, just because it was hard to break my Netscape habit. The Safari browser also solved the problem, but for some reason (maybe it's my computer), web pages opening in Safari take forever to load.

So...FIREFOX is my winner and may become my browser of choice (certainly, at least, while using Ancestry.Com). THANKS for your help, all who responded!

Bob W.
13 March 2006, 04:55 PM
... Just wonder if any other Ancestry users have found a way around this problem.

I wonder if you've considered getting US Census data from somewhere other than Ancestry.com.

I've been accessing the U.S. Census records by way of Heritage Quest Online (http://www.heritagequestonline.com). I discovered that our municipal public library provides on-line access to this site for members without charge (by way of the Ohio Public Library Information Network). I'm able to download the images as .pdf and .tiff files.

(FYI, I've been mostly using GraphicConverter to view them.)

The libary also gives me access to over a hundred useful paysites that have to do with just about any subject that you can imagine. One I particularly like is the Oxford English Dictionary. Recently, curious about the origins of my surname, I looked it up in the O.E.D. It had a boat-load of superbly-researched information that traces it back to pre-medievel times.

You might talk to your local library to see what they provide along these lines.

Lil
13 March 2006, 10:05 PM
I wonder if you've considered getting US Census data from somewhere other than Ancestry.com.

I've been accessing the U.S. Census records by way of Heritage Quest Online (http://www.heritagequestonline.com). I discovered that our municipal public library provides on-line access to this site for members without charge (by way of the Ohio Public Library Information Network). I'm able to download the images as .pdf and .tiff files.

(FYI, I've been mostly using GraphicConverter to view them.)



HeritageQuest is a great source for census viewing. The main problem I have with it is that it doesn't carry all the records yet, especially the 1880 census. Do hope it will soon be added.

Lil

Edward Linggi
14 March 2006, 08:57 PM
HeritageQuest is a great source for census viewing. The main problem I have with it is that it doesn't carry all the records yet, especially the 1880 census. Do hope it will soon be added.

Lil
You can get around this problem by searching using the LDS family search and then using their free census 1880 database. Record the census file roll and page. Use "Find by Page" on Heritage Quest using the 1880 Census and enummerating the roll and page number. Ed

DelbertCurlin
16 March 2006, 11:28 AM
You can get around this problem by searching using the LDS family search and then using their free census 1880 database. Record the census file roll and page. Use "Find by Page" on Heritage Quest using the 1880 Census and enummerating the roll and page number. Ed

When I access Heritage Quest there is no 1880 Census to access. How do you do this?

Delbert
in Tennesse

Edward Linggi
16 March 2006, 06:23 PM
When I access Heritage Quest there is no 1880 Census to access. How do you do this?

On the Census search page, there is : Basic Search, Advanced Search, and Find By Page Number. Use Find by Page Number. Scroll the Series to 1880 Census which is T9. Then put in the Roll # and Page #. The information you are looking for may be on the second page. There is an A page and a B page. ED

jmo
16 March 2006, 08:07 PM
When I access Heritage Quest there is no 1880 Census to access. How do you do this?

Delbert
in Tennesse

The 1880 Census index is available for free access on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.com.

raybornr
17 March 2006, 12:30 AM
When I access Heritage Quest there is no 1880 Census to access. How do you do this?

Delbert
in Tennesse

The 1880 Census is available from the opening "Census" page by clicking on the "Browse" Button at the top of the page.

ALL existant census records are on HeritageQuestOnline including 1830-1850, 1880 and All 1930. These last years are NOT indexed, but the images are available.

The list on the left of the search page are the ones that are INDEXED.

Roger Rayborn

DelbertCurlin
17 March 2006, 05:41 PM
On the Census search page, there is : Basic Search, Advanced Search, and Find By Page Number. Use Find by Page Number. Scroll the Series to 1880 Census which is T9. Then put in the Roll # and Page #. The information you are looking for may be on the second page. There is an A page and a B page. ED

Thanks Ed. I had never noticed those options in Heritage Quest so I have been missing access to so much more material to keep me searching. Also thanks to the others for their comments and helpful directions.

Delbert in Tennessee
Researching White, Buckner, Rosser, Bushart, McClish, Curlin, and numerous others.
OS X 10.3.9, ibook G3.

Jay Kay
18 March 2006, 08:51 AM
once I zoom a census image large enough to be able to read it (in other words, anything larger than 50%), the census image is no longer fully in view, i.e., the entire right end of the page in 1910, 1920, etc. is missing and there's no way to pan across to see what it says.
Just wonder if any other Ancestry users have found a way around this problem.

Is this peculiar to US records? On UK records I just use the horizontal scroll bar provided at the bottom of the image.

Jay

DelbertCurlin
19 March 2006, 11:17 AM
The 1880 Census index is available for free access on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.com.I am unable to get anything free from Ancestry.com. and FamilySearch.com is most often unavailable for access.

Delbert in Tennessee

Steve W. Jackson
20 March 2006, 07:23 PM
I am unable to get anything free from Ancestry.com. and FamilySearch.com is most often unavailable for access.

Delbert in TennesseeFamilySearch.com is a redirect to FamilySearch.org. Although I don't use it frequently, I've never been unable to reach it when I try.

= Steve =

WilliamTaber
20 March 2006, 08:29 PM
once I zoom a census image large enough to be able to read it (in other words, anything larger than 50%), the census image is no longer fully in view, i.e., the entire right end of the page in 1910, 1920, etc. is missing and there's no way to pan across to see what it says.
Just wonder if any other Ancestry users have found a way around this problem.
I have not seen this problem on Ancestry.com. When I use it with either Safari or Firefox, I get scroll bars that allow me to pan the image. Genealogy.com though is a different story. I see the problem you described exactly with Safari on Genealogy.com. However, Firefox works fine there as well. As you might guess, my default browser is now set to Firefox.

STEVE
21 March 2006, 03:56 AM
...once I zoom a census image large enough to be able to read it (in other words, anything larger than 50%), the census image is no longer fully in view, i.e., the entire right end of the page in 1910, 1920, etc. is missing and there's no way to pan across to see what it says.
Just wonder if any other Ancestry users have found a way around this problem.

Judith, I don't use Ancestry, but there's an old Mac trick that might help you. Just drag your browser screen off the left edge of the screen (click-hold on the topmost part of the window) and then click-hold on the bottom right corner and drag the window as wide as you need it to be. You can repeat this as many times as necessary. You have to drag the virtual window created back and forth to read each line, but you will be able to have the copy at 100%.

Hope this helps, STEVE

brippa
08 June 2006, 01:09 PM
Followed this thread and I am curious as to value of Ancestry.com given their fairly stiff fees for access and use especially since they seem relucant to accomodate Mac users. While I recognize the convenience of working from home on your computer, I am not convinced it is worth the cost especially when you can access Ancestry from other locations. The Mormon Family History Centers in all its locations have computers which access Ancestry at no charge to you. Additionally many public libraries also subscribe to Ancestry. I know that mine does and since it is convenient I let my tax dollars pay for it. In fact at one point I was able to get to their database from home using the libarry. It stopped and when I inquired was told that the charges for allowing users access to the database from home was so exhorbitant that they had to stop and restrict it to use on the library computers. I am curious as to what alternatives there are to Ancestry which are not necessarily free but with reasonable fees.

martha
09 June 2006, 01:07 AM
Followed this thread and I am curious as to value of Ancestry.com given their fairly stiff fees for access and use especially since they seem relucant to accomodate Mac users. While I recognize the convenience of working from home on your computer, I am not convinced it is worth the cost especially when you can access Ancestry from other locations. The Mormon Family History Centers in all its locations have computers which access Ancestry at no charge to you. Additionally many public libraries also subscribe to Ancestry. I know that mine does and since it is convenient I let my tax dollars pay for it. In fact at one point I was able to get to their database from home using the libarry. It stopped and when I inquired was told that the charges for allowing users access to the database from home was so exhorbitant that they had to stop and restrict it to use on the library computers. I am curious as to what alternatives there are to Ancestry which are not necessarily free but with reasonable fees.

Not all of us live in the USA where there are libraries and FHL that have access to Ancestry, you know. And while I cannot afford Ancestry privately, I have made arrangements with people to give me their library card ID since they never do online research so that I can still do work from where I live abroad. I used to be subscribed to Godfrey Memorial Library, but they lost their access to Heritage and therefore their usefulness to me, alas. Their fees were very reasonable. They still have other for-pay databases available for your subscription, but they just aren't what I need. Maybe they would be good for you. Try their website and see.

Martha

Joe Carroll
09 June 2006, 07:56 PM
I use Ancestry a lot and have no trouble viewing images. It is true that images are bigger than the screen (I use 150%) but there are scroll bars for use. I have OS10.3.9 on a G5 and use Safari1.3.2. My most useful thing is to download a census image and then I can view it later (with Preview) for detail that I wouldn't think initially to look for. I only donwload the images that seem to have relevance.

--------- Joe

WilliamTaber
09 June 2006, 11:15 PM
Followed this thread and I am curious as to value of Ancestry.com given their fairly stiff fees for access and use especially since they seem relucant to accomodate Mac users. While I recognize the convenience of working from home on your computer, I am not convinced it is worth the cost especially when you can access Ancestry from other locations. The Mormon Family History Centers in all its locations have computers which access Ancestry at no charge to you. Additionally many public libraries also subscribe to Ancestry. I know that mine does and since it is convenient I let my tax dollars pay for it. In fact at one point I was able to get to their database from home using the libarry. It stopped and when I inquired was told that the charges for allowing users access to the database from home was so exhorbitant that they had to stop and restrict it to use on the library computers. I am curious as to what alternatives there are to Ancestry which are not necessarily free but with reasonable fees.

The value you can get from it really depends on how much time you can spend using it, I think. I personally spend a lot of time using it, so it is quite worthwhile to me. It also might depend on your research parameters. If you aren't interested in researching the lines from your great grandparent's siblings (great granduncles & aunts and their descendants) or even lines that date further back, then your value might be limited.

Their advanced image viewer available on Windows is only marginally an improvement over the standard image viewer, in my opinion. The real advantage I see for it is if you have subscriptions to printed text works (such as archival newspapers). The advanced image viewer will highlight the text that you searched for, which can certainly be a big help for those images.

Having access at home, verses being at the library, is certainly a big advantage. I can do some research at home while having my morning coffee, which just isn't possible for me at the library.