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edjoann
19 September 2005, 09:26 PM
I have just added an ibook to set of two mac commputers. the other is an eMac. In initializing the ibook it was easy to transfer all the data over a fire wire cable. All went well. The basic question now is hkow do I keep the desk top model eMAC up graded with my many Reunion updates that I will be making using the ibook. I am willing to read a lot of verbage butI just don't know where to look.

Ed Wallace edward.joann@verizon.net

Wayne Till
21 September 2005, 01:53 AM
I have just added an ibook to set of two mac computers. the other is an eMac. In initializing the ibook it was easy to transfer all the data over a fire wire cable. All went well. The basic question now is how do I keep the desk top model eMAC up graded with my many Reunion updates that I will be making using the ibook.I recommend a flash drive (a USB device about the size of a pack of gum). I have a 128 MB model which now sells for less than $20. I copy the files from my main computer to the secondary computer. Just be sure to always move the files in the same direction (e.g. from laptop to desktop) to avoid writing over newer data with an older copy.

Wayne Till

Al mitchell
21 September 2005, 09:11 PM
I have just added an ibook to set of two mac commputers. the other is an eMac. In initializing the ibook it was easy to transfer all the data over a fire wire cable. All went well. The basic question now is hkow do I keep the desk top model eMAC up graded with my many Reunion updates that I will be making using the ibook. I am willing to read a lot of verbage butI just don't know where to look.

Ed Wallace edward.joann@verizon.net

There are several ways to tackle the job. One has been mentioned, a flash memory drive. I just bought a 1 GB version for $49. If you are using a home network, wired or wireless, you could point Reunion to your family file(s)on your main (server) computer. Then there is no need to update data bases. If you use this method, make sure you locate the Reunion data file and supporting files so they are shared and accessible. If you will have an internet or network connection, you could use remote desktop (extra price) and still only work with one Reunion file. Apple has just bumped up the .Mac space to 1 GB, so you could put your file there. Whatever you decide to do, backup backup backup!

Al

Click here to email me (firemedic45@mac.com)

S. Craig
26 September 2005, 04:47 PM
I recommend a flash drive (a USB device about the size of a pack of gum). I have a 128 MB model which now sells for less than $20. I copy the files from my main computer to the secondary computer. Just be sure to always move the files in the same direction (e.g. from laptop to desktop) to avoid writing over newer data with an older copy.Hi Wayne,

When you talk about "files" being copied would you copy your whole <home directory> file? What I find hard is remembering which files I have modified between file transfers. I haven't gotten into a reliable routine although what I 'try' to do with my iBook is any files that I open and modify at the archives, I 'try' to always drag that file to the desktop for later transfer with my memory stick back into the iMac.

I am probably missing something really obvious ... but in your post, you mention to always move the files in the same direction to avoid writing over newer data (which I have already done once). If you always move data via the memory stick from your laptop (main) to the desktop (secondary), how do you put any new information that you happen to have from your desktop (secondary) into your laptop (main)?

What I do, but find that it is long, so don't do very often, is hook up the laptop and desktop computers and transfer my <home directory> file from the desktop (main) to the portable one (secondary). That is the only way I figure that I am sure that I have not forgotten any files which are in that directory that I have modified. If there is an easier or better way, I would appreciate hearing from anyone. At the moment I haven't bought any sync programs or have a subscription for .Mac account. I don't know if I trust that no one would be able to hack into my info or if their site were to crash... (although it would probably be less likely than mine crashing.


Thanks in advance,

Sherry

Wayne Till
27 September 2005, 12:55 PM
When you talk about "files" being copied would you copy your whole <home directory> file? What I find hard is remembering which files I have modified between file transfers. I haven't gotten into a reliable routine although what I 'try' to do with my iBook is any files that I open and modify at the archives, I 'try' to always drag that file to the desktop for later transfer with my memory stick back into the iMac.

I am probably missing something really obvious ... but in your post, you mention to always move the files in the same direction to avoid writing over newer data (which I have already done once). If you always move data via the memory stick from your laptop (main) to the desktop (secondary), how do you put any new information that you happen to have from your desktop (secondary) into your laptop (main)?...I was referring to keeping your family data file on your laptop and working on it at a site (e.g. the Family History Center), then returning home to update the file on your desktop computer. You could also keep a "notes" folder on the laptop and transfer it in the same way. Then each time you make the transfer from laptop to desktop, you copy the family data file (and notes folder) from the laptop to the flashdrive, overwriting any older files on it, then plug it into your desktop computer and transfer the files to your desktop computer's Reunion folder, again overwriting any older files.

Obviously, this is not a complete backup of all your essential files on your computer(s), but is an easy way of keeping a backup of your family file and notes. You want an external hard drive to do a complete backup.

A small flash drive (e.g. 128 MB) will easily accommodate family files, notes and several graphics files. If you are going to copy many graphic files (e.g. census pages, online book pages, etc.) you may want to consider a larger flash drive. You can get a 1 GB drive for $150 or less.

S. Craig
28 September 2005, 01:45 AM
Obviously, this is not a complete backup of all your essential files on your computer(s), but is an easy way of keeping a backup of your family file and notes. You want an external hard drive to do a complete backup.Hi Wayne,

When you do a complete backup onto an external hard drive, what-all do you put there? Example: your iMacHD??

Thanks,

Sherry

Wayne Till
29 September 2005, 12:41 AM
When you do a complete backup onto an external hard drive, what-all do you put there? Example: your iMacHD??I have an external firewire hard drive I use to back up my computer. It has several partitions, each capable of holding the entire contents of my computer's hard disk (40GB). I use a shareware program called Carbon Copy Cloner (http://www.bombich.com/software/ccc.html), which makes an exact, bootable copy of the entire hard disk. I then use another partition for the next backup - so I always have at least two backups of my hard disk. There are other backup strategies, but this one is simple and works for me.

Janet Mobley
29 September 2005, 09:02 PM
Hi Wayne,

When you talk about "files" being copied would you copy your whole <home directory> file? What I find hard is remembering which files I have modified between file transfers. I haven't gotten into a reliable routine although what I 'try' to do with my iBook is any files that I open and modify at the archives, I 'try' to always drag that file to the desktop for later transfer with my memory stick back into the iMac.

I am probably missing something really obvious ... but in your post, you mention to always move the files in the same direction to avoid writing over newer data (which I have already done once). If you always move data via the memory stick from your laptop (main) to the desktop (secondary), how do you put any new information that you happen to have from your desktop (secondary) into your laptop (main)?

What I do, but find that it is long, so don't do very often, is hook up the laptop and desktop computers and transfer my <home directory> file from the desktop (main) to the portable one (secondary). That is the only way I figure that I am sure that I have not forgotten any files which are in that directory that I have modified. If there is an easier or better way, I would appreciate hearing from anyone. At the moment I haven't bought any sync programs or have a subscription for .Mac account. I don't know if I trust that no one would be able to hack into my info or if their site were to crash... (although it would probably be less likely than mine crashing.I have another solution. I have Airports cards in both iMac and PowerBook. Whenever I add info. to one of the Reunion files I save as:My Family.date. This would work with a pen drive too as you'd always know which was the most recent version as it would be dated.

Janet Mobley

Bob White
04 October 2005, 03:49 AM
I have an external firewire hard drive I use to back up my computer. It has several partitions, each capable of holding the entire contents of my computer's hard disk (40GB). I use a shareware program called Carbon Copy Cloner (http://www.bombich.com/software/ccc.html), which makes an exact, bootable copy of the entire hard disk. I then use another partition for the next backup - so I always have at least two backups of my hard disk. There are other backup strategies, but this one is simple and works for me.You are doing one thing that I recommend that you change. Specifically, your multiple backups are on the same media -- that external hard disk. Anything that one uses --- be it hard disk, CD's, Zip disks, whatever.. are subject to failure. Thus, one shouldn't put all the eggs in one basket.

botteron
21 December 2005, 06:51 PM
I recently bought a Powerbook (OS 10.4). My old files are on my G3 (OS 9, installed 10 but can't get it to work and don't dare to until I can move the files to the Powerbook). How can I move the files?

I used a flash drive but the Powerbook won't open the files from it. Michael Martin helped me get the Reunion files working (thanks again!). He said that flash drives are typically pre-formatted for non-Macs, so the Type and Creator codes of my files got lost. Are there Mac-formatted flash drives? I haven't been able to find one.

For the rest of the files -- Someone said to connect the two Macs with an ethernet cable, but they couldn't recognize each other.

Page 37 of the Powerbook manual says to use a FireWire cable. As far as I can see, they didn't include this cable with the Powerbook. I looked at MacConnection but there seem to be several types of FireWire cables. Can someone help me find an appropriate cable? Also, is there anything more I need to know beyond the directions in the manual? Thank you!

Steve W. Jackson
21 December 2005, 07:33 PM
I recently bought a Powerbook (OS 10.4). My old files are on my G3 (OS 9, installed 10 but can't get it to work and don't dare to until I can move the files to the Powerbook). How can I move the files?

I used a flash drive but the Powerbook won't open the files from it. Michael Martin helped me get the Reunion files working (thanks again!). He said that flash drives are typically pre-formatted for non-Macs, so the Type and Creator codes of my files got lost. Are there Mac-formatted flash drives? I haven't been able to find one.

For the rest of the files -- Someone said to connect the two Macs with an ethernet cable, but they couldn't recognize each other.

Page 37 of the Powerbook manual says to use a FireWire cable. As far as I can see, they didn't include this cable with the Powerbook. I looked at MacConnection but there seem to be several types of FireWire cables. Can someone help me find an appropriate cable? Also, is there anything more I need to know beyond the directions in the manual? Thank you!
FireWire is often the best, fastest way of doing this. But your PowerBook will not include the necessary cable, and your G3 (depending on model) may not allow you to use it. If the G3 isn't a model with built-in FireWire, it's probably not going to happen.

Since you've already got a "flash drive", you should look first at simply reinitializing it. You should be able to attach it and then use Disk Utility to "Erase" it, at which point you can specify that the new volume should be formatted as Mac OS Extended (commonly called HFS+). That should be the simplest solution for you. From that point on, your drive will always be well-behaved in a Mac setting. :)

= Steve =

Urs Geiser
22 December 2005, 12:27 PM
I recently bought a Powerbook (OS 10.4). My old files are on my G3 (OS 9, installed 10 but can't get it to work and don't dare to until I can move the files to the Powerbook). How can I move the files?
In addition to what Steve suggested, if you have the hardware you can burn your files on the G3 to CD (Mac formatted, of course) and read them into your new Powerbook.

I do this when I copy files from my wife's older iBook (OS 9.2, too little horsepower, esp. disk space, to run OS X) to the desktop iMac G5. I haven't been able to get file sharing to work over an ethernet cable (either directly via crossover or through a hub), and my flash drive is PC formatted because I need that to share with the PC at work.

Edward Linggi
22 December 2005, 11:17 PM
For the rest of the files -- Someone said to connect the two Macs with an ethernet cable, but they couldn't recognize each other.

If you are connecting the computers through just the ethernet cable you will need to use a cross over ethernet cable. This is not the same as an regular ethernet cable. If you have a router you would be able to connect the computers through the router.
On the new computer do you have OS 9 installed?

Linda.H
23 December 2005, 12:01 AM
Botteron, all 3 methods you mention are feasible. Maybe the following will help:

1) You don't need a "Mac-formatted" drive -- Macs have no problem using pc-formatted media. Transferring by flash drive should have worked, but sometimes files do "lose" identity on pc-formatted drives. If you have "Stuff-It" or another compression utility, try stuffing the file before copying it to the flash drive, then un-stuff it on the Powerbook. That should prevent the Type and Creator data from being lost.

2) You should also be able to use Ethernet to connect the two Macs, but that involves setting up a 2-computer local network, not just connecting the cable. You don't need an ethernet router, but without setting up network configurations on each Mac they won't "see" each other.
Edward mentioned a cross-over cable, but newer model Macs don't require it -- they handle the switching internally, so straight-through cables work just fine. I can't say whether your G3 qualifies as a new enough machine, but the Powerbook should handle the switching. You could try the network approach and see if that works.

3) Firewire would be the easiest way to transfer files if both computers have Firewire ports -- you need a Firewire 400 cable with "flat" connectors at both ends -- 6 pin & 6 pin. (Not the 6 pin/4 pin "A/B" cable that has a flat end and a small square end). Anyplace that sells computers should have the cable you need. Don't get FW 800 cables -- your G3 probably doesn't have an 800 port. They have different connector ends and aren't interchangeable with the 400 cables.
To use the FW cable, shut down the Powerbook, connect the cable to the G3 and to the Powerbook, turn the PB back on and hold down the "T" key while it boots up -- this puts it in "target-mode" -- it will mount on your G3's desktop just like an external hard disk. Copy files to/from the PB, then drag the PB icon to the trash to "eject" the drive. Restart the PB to revert to "normal" mode.

Hope this helps. -- Linda

Al Poulin
23 December 2005, 03:20 PM
I recently bought a Powerbook (OS 10.4). My old files are on my G3 (OS 9, installed 10 but can't get it to work and don't dare to until I can move the files to the Powerbook). How can I move the files?

Good idea to keep using OS 9 on the G3 until everything is settled.

I used a flash drive but the Powerbook won't open the files from it. Michael Martin helped me get the Reunion files working (thanks again!). He said that flash drives are typically pre-formatted for non-Macs, so the Type and Creator codes of my files got lost. Are there Mac-formatted flash drives? I haven't been able to find one.


When I bought my current generation iBook a couple months ago, I also bought a flash drive which works very well, moving small files between Macs and from the PC at the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, to the iBook, my wife's G3 Powerbook, and our desktop Mac. This flash drive is the USB 2.0 SanDisk Cruzer Micro which works on our old Macs in USB 1.1. The package has the Mac OS X label on it. The physically larger "Mini" model would work as well. See the SanDisk web site for more info. Both models have been on rebate sales at various big box stores including Best Buy, Office Depot, and Staples. Also check CompUSA.

For the rest of the files -- Someone said to connect the two Macs with an ethernet cable, but they couldn't recognize each other.

There is something wrong in your setup. But make sure your cable is a good one. Details for this connection are in your Finder Help files in both OS 9 and OS X. Search on terms like ethernet, file sharing, apple talk, TCP/IP. The Apple web site has more thorough treatment on connecting two computers under the Support tab; use the same search terms.



Page 37 of the Powerbook manual says to use a FireWire cable. As far as I can see, they didn't include this cable with the Powerbook. I looked at MacConnection but there seem to be several types of FireWire cables. Can someone help me find an appropriate cable? Also, is there anything more I need to know beyond the directions in the manual? Thank you!

For connecting my new iBook (with Firewire 400) to my G4 tower (QuickSilver), I use Apple's 6-pin to 6-pin firewire cable, 1.8 meters long. Each end is identical to the other. This cable comes with a neat plastic holder to retain each end of the cable and to control the cable length in a coil. You need to check your User's Guide for what version of Firewire is on your new PowerBook. If it is the faster Firewire 800, you'll need a different cable than mine, maybe a 6-pin to 9-pin. The Apple web site has an array of the different Firewire cables.

theKiwi
23 December 2005, 03:35 PM
I used a flash drive but the Powerbook won't open the files from it. Michael Martin helped me get the Reunion files working (thanks again!). He said that flash drives are typically pre-formatted for non-Macs, so the Type and Creator codes of my files got lost. Are there Mac-formatted flash drives? I haven't been able to find one.

When I bought my current generation iBook a couple months ago, I also bought a flash drive which works very well, moving small files between Macs and from the PC at the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, to the iBook, my wife's G3 Powerbook, and our desktop Mac. This flash drive is the USB 2.0 SanDisk Cruzer Micro which works on our old Macs in USB 1.1. The package has the Mac OS X label on it. The physically larger "Mini" model would work as well. See the SanDisk web site for more info. Both models have been on rebate sales at various big box stores including Best Buy, Office Depot, and Staples. Also check CompUSA.

Even though new flash drives might have the Mac OS X logo on them, unless specifically marked, they are NOT formatted in Mac OS format (HFS+).

But Mac OS X is clever enough to deal with using a PC formatted flash drive and keeping files intact on it while moving to Windows machines.

The distinction here is that the flash drive was used between a Mac OS 9 machine and a Mac OS X machine, and being Windows formatted, it couldn't handle the resource fork of the file which held the type and creator codes.

If you have a Flash Drive and will never use it on a Windows machine, you can format it to Macintosh HFS+ format either with Disk Utility in Mac OS X or with the Erase Disk command in Mac OS 9. Then files moved between Mac OS 9 and Mac OS X will retain their type and creator codes.

Roger

Al Poulin
23 December 2005, 10:07 PM
There is more, basic information available at Apple's web site at this article: "Mac OS: Moving files from your older Macintosh to a new one"
http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=25575

Then follow the links from that article to others. These articles at Apple's web site help make sense out of all those little, disconnected Help files in the Finder.

Also, at Apple's web site, you can search on related terms including ethernet, file sharing, apple talk, and TCP/IP, and maybe even connecting computes. Years ago, I found it very helpful to borrow the books from the public library on Macintosh. The networking and file sharing chapters were very helpful in understanding the basic ideas of what to do.

Today, I use David Pogue's Mac OS X, The Missing Manual series for basic reference. Robin Williams also has excellent books out for reference.

Bill Williams
25 December 2005, 12:25 AM
Firewire would be the easiest way to transfer files if both computers have Firewire ports -- you need a Firewire 400 cable with "flat" connectors at both ends -- 6 pin & 6 pin. (Not the 6 pin/4 pin "A/B" cable that has a flat end and a small square end). Anyplace that sells computers should have the cable you need.

Don't you believe it! I spent the better part of this morning trying to locate a 6-pin/6-pin Firewire cable -- places such as Radio Shack and Circuit City only seem to stock the 4 pin to 6 pin cables (used to transfer video to PC, I think), but gladly anser "Yes!" when asked on the phone if they have Firewire cables in stock. Mom and Pop comuter stores likewise. I finally found what I wanted at a Best Buy.

Al Poulin
30 December 2005, 08:57 PM
Even though new flash drives might have the Mac OS X logo on them, unless specifically marked, they are NOT formatted in Mac OS format (HFS+).

But Mac OS X is clever enough to deal with using a PC formatted flash drive and keeping files intact on it while moving to Windows machines.

The distinction here is that the flash drive was used between a Mac OS 9 machine and a Mac OS X machine, and being Windows formatted, it couldn't handle the resource fork of the file which held the type and creator codes.

If you have a Flash Drive and will never use it on a Windows machine, you can format it to Macintosh HFS+ format either with Disk Utility in Mac OS X or with the Erase Disk command in Mac OS 9. Then files moved between Mac OS 9 and Mac OS X will retain their type and creator codes.

Roger

Thank you, Roger, for pointing this out in detail. After the success I had with my flash drive with the PC at the Family History Library, I would have been wonderfully confused if I had tried to do Mac-to-Mac transfers here at home without re-formatting. Now, as my wife said, I'll keep mine formatted for PC, and we can use the one I gave my wife for Christmas for Mac OS9-to-Mac OSX after reformatting.

AlGunn
31 January 2006, 11:29 AM
Thank you, Roger, for pointing this out in detail. After the success I had with my flash drive with the PC at the Family History Library, I would have been wonderfully confused if I had tried to do Mac-to-Mac transfers here at home without re-formatting. Now, as my wife said, I'll keep mine formatted for PC, and we can use the one I gave my wife for Christmas for Mac OS9-to-Mac OSX after reformatting.

Hi!
I had a similar problem in some of the schools I support.

If you only have one USB flash drive and are working over PCs, 9.2 Macs and OSX macs it is a pain to have to pick a format.

You can make a virtual MAC format disk image on the PC formatted USB stick using diskcopy on the os9 mac.

Find diskcopy in applications(os9):utilities

Run it and choose "Make new image" from the image menu.

Choose the usb drive as the location and call it anything you fancy (I use Apple Transfer.IMG) and choose a size (1.4 M is a little small for most things! :-)

It will Zero the file and ask you to format it.
Click "Erase" to complete the format.

You can then copy files with resource forks intact between os9 and osx macs and also copy files between PC and mac!

If anyone knows of a utility for PC to mount apple .img files the whole problem is solved.

Hope this helps!

Al

Macworthy
22 February 2006, 07:00 PM
I have the same situation, iMac and an iBook.

I thought I could go just to the family file in Reunion (I make an Alias of it) and drag it to the iBook via my home network and it would be a duplicate of my original working family file. Today when I try it, nothing updates on the iBook, it's still the family file with no changes.

I have a flash drive that everyone has mentioned, but if you're networked, you should not have to use it to transfer the family file right?

I use the iMac for all of the work, but would like the iBook to be in sync for reference when I am not at my desk.

Is there a reason why the family file isn't updating? Also, I have all the photos in a seperate folder in my home folder, besides being in iPhoto, so I can easily take that folder and back it up. But when I send that folder to my iBook, obviously the pictures don't show up in Reunion, because the home folder path is of my iMac. Is there a way to batch change them in the iBook? I've only been a Mac user for a few years so I am still learning.

Thanks.

DBaddorf
23 February 2006, 06:30 PM
I have the same situation, iMac and an iBook.

I thought I could go just to the family file in Reunion (I make an Alias of it) and drag it to the iBook via my home network and it would be a duplicate of my original working family file. Today when I try it, nothing updates on the iBook, it's still the family file with no changes.


Did you drag the ALIAS or the actual file? If you drag the alias, then only the alias will be copied. This isn't what you desire! If you right-click (or control-click) on the alias, there ought to be an option to "show original". In other words --- find the actual file for me. THEN you can drag the REAL file across the network, and it should copy just peachy-keen-o. :-)

Deb Baddorf

Bill McQuary
23 February 2006, 07:17 PM
Is there a reason why the family file isn't updating?There sure is. What you want to do is move the Reunion file from your iBook to your iMac and replace the old Reunion file in your iBook with the one moved from your iBook.

Move it via your network to your iBook's desktop. Trash the old one in your Reunion folder and then drag the new one from your Desktop to your Reunion folder.

Nothing in Reunion software that I'm aware of is capable of updating or synchronizing two different Reunion files. The merge function comes close.

Hope this helps.

Regards,
Bill

Macworthy
08 March 2006, 05:33 PM
Did you drag the ALIAS or the actual file? If you drag the alias, then only the alias will be copied. This isn't what you desire! If you right-click (or control-click) on the alias, there ought to be an option to "show original". In other words --- find the actual file for me. THEN you can drag the REAL file across the network, and it should copy just peachy-keen-o. :-)

Deb Baddorf

That was the problem. I've never used the Alias feature before and thought it was like making a copy of everything. Is this the right was to copy the file, or can I just use the Copy feature. It seems like I tried using Copy and there was an issue, I researched into it and I came up with the Alias solution. Maybe that wasn't my problem to begin with. Oh well...that part is working now!

Thanks, Sandy

Bob White
11 March 2006, 12:57 AM
........I do this when I copy files from my wife's older iBook (OS 9.2, too little horsepower, esp. disk space, to run OS X) to the desktop iMac G5.......

Is this a clamshell iMac or a white iMac? Just curious as any white model from original to present will run Tiger just fine as long as it has at least 512 MB of RAM. The old clamshells.... what you said!

Urs Geiser
13 March 2006, 01:16 PM
Is this a clamshell iMac or a white iMac? Just curious as any white model from original to present will run Tiger just fine as long as it has at least 512 MB of RAM. The old clamshells.... what you said!
It's a white iMac G3 with a 15 GB hard drive, I think the late 2001 model. I don't have it here with me thus can't tell you the other specs. I remember adding more memory, probably upped it from 128 to 256 MB. Speed is probably 500 MHz. It had OS X 10.1.something preloaded. I took one look at OS X when we first got it, decided that I had no use for it (then) and that the Finder felt too sluggish, and booted into 9.2 ever since.

I could probably spend some money on it (more RAM, retail OS X 10.4, maybe a bigger hard drive, various software updates), but I'm not sure it's worth it. Just for the occasional file transfer (the original topic of this thread), I have workarounds for the possible problems.