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conniegene
13 August 2005, 11:15 PM
I have just taken on the task of sorting and scanning (as appropriate) hundreds of negatives from my dad's side of the family from the last 100 years! Does anyone have suggestions on how to best organize the negatives themselves. I plan on getting some archival materials for storage, but should the negatives be sorted by date, location, family group, or what? Thanks for any ideas you might have!

Lynda
14 August 2005, 10:51 AM
I have done a similar task with my negatives and it seemed most logical to store them by date in archival sleeves that slip into binders. You can get both sleeves and binders in archive-friendly materials at a professional photo store. The date decision was obvious, because negatives typically are in groups (two or four, sometimes five) depending on how they were processed, and you don't want to separate them unless you have to. Also, I found it easier to identify problem pictures when I had the context of the rest of the roll to look at. You may need some additional system of cross-referencing to keep track of pictures of Uncle Joe at home, for instance, but you would need that no matter how you divided them.
For the prints I have that match the negatives, it is relatively easy to label each print with the date or to store them in an acid-free box divided by date. Naturally you will store the negs and prints in separate places, if possible, to minimize risk of total loss.
Lynda

conniegene
14 August 2005, 12:12 PM
Thanks for the suggestion..unfortunately it will not be an easy task because most of these are not in the traditional strips of negatives that we get today. Most are individual negatives that are about 3x4 inches and they are all mixed up! Dating them will be a big job too. Fortunately we have printed copies in some albums that will help with this.

Barb

bmohr
14 August 2005, 06:44 PM
I suggest reading Maureen Taylor's book "Preserving Your Family Photographs: How to Organize, Present, and Restore Your Precious Family Images" (Betterway Books, 2001). It's a great guide to managing a family photo archive.

I also recommend Light Impressions (http://www.lightimpressionsdirect.com). They have a great selection of archival storage materials, including sleeves for all sorts of negatives. I have hundreds of old 120/620 roll film negatives (2.25 x 3.25 inches) in Light Impressions sleeves.

STEVE
15 August 2005, 08:35 PM
Thanks for the suggestion..unfortunately it will not be an easy task because most of these are not in the traditional strips of negatives that we get today. Most are individual negatives that are about 3x4 inches and they are all mixed up! Dating them will be a big job too. Fortunately we have printed copies in some albums that will help with this. BarbMay I suggest a work-around of great worth? A program called "iView" <www.iview-multimedia.com>. Create whatever sorting system you want for your negatives. Dates, random numbers, whatever. Then scan the negatives as you normally would to use them. Drop these images into iView. The program will automatically create thumbnails at your prefered size. From there, the program will help you to automatically, semi-automatically, or individually create a data base entry for each negative/photo.

The program itself will create Media Information: such as Media type, file type, encoding...

Then you are given four major areas to enter data that identifies and makes unique each image. Annotations, People, Keywords and Categories. All of this is searchable and sortable.

A lot of hours can be put into creating a good catalogue, but once created it is invaluable. There is a free reader available so you can share your work. I like the program and enjoy working with it. So far it has been totally stable for me. I've been using the program for many years.

STEVE

conniegene
15 August 2005, 11:36 PM
Thanks for the suggestions! I will take a look at iView and see how it works. I also notice that Light Impressions has archival CDs which is something we are also interested in. Now, to take/find the time to do all the sorting, scanning, etc!

Barb

pheski
17 August 2005, 06:24 PM
I will take a look at iView and... Light Impressions

I have been using iView for several years. I began when I get a digital camera and suddenly was faced with 10-20 times the number of pictures to sort/store. I can enthusiastically recommend it. It will handle multiple media types, can generate slide shows and galleries.

Peter

Kevin McKinney
11 September 2005, 11:50 PM
I have just taken on the task of sorting and scanning (as appropriate) hundreds of negatives from my dad's side of the family from the last 100 years! Does anyone have suggestions on how to best organize the negatives themselves. I plan on getting some archival materials for storage, but should the negatives be sorted by date, location, family group, or what? Thanks for any ideas you might have!

Allied to your comment, my organizational problem relates to the indexing of digital photographs. Currently my photographs have only file numbers, produced automatically by a digital scanner. I would like index them in relation to my Reunion 8.06 ID numbers. Any ideas?

Robert Godfrey
12 September 2005, 07:01 PM
Allied to your comment, my organizational problem relates to the indexing of digital photographs. Currently my photographs have only file numbers, produced automatically by a digital scanner. I would like index them in relation to my Reunion 8.06 ID numbers. Any ideas?A relational database would fill the bill. That allows you to create any number of "keywords" (last name, first name, location, number, ad infinitum) that you can then use to find any particular image.

I actually have offered such a database to the list, but I'm embarrassed to say that I haven't had the time to "de-customize" it. (I created it for a specific project, so it needs altering for general use.)

If I can get to it soon, I'll let you (and the others who expressed interest) know.