PDA

View Full Version : How to calculate what day a cetain date falls on


Maxine Crabtree
01 August 2005, 01:18 AM
I am trying to find how to determine what day November 22, 1958 fell on. I use to know how to do this but now I just don't know. I checked my manual
(I'm using version 5) but I could not find a listing. Thanks, Maxine

fjvanbodegom
01 August 2005, 04:41 AM
I suppose that the date you mention is one of the events in your Reunion 5 Familyfile. Press Command T (or List -> Ages) and you see all the major events of that person including the day of the week.
In the Reunion 5 Manual go to chapter 21, where all is explained.
When not working with Reunion I use a very simple to use and handsome program (also a fine Calendar calculator) InterCal. It is free.

Frank Mitchell
01 August 2005, 04:45 AM
I am trying to find how to determine what day November 22, 1958 fell on. I use to know how to do this but now I just don't know. I checked my manual
(I'm using version 5) but I could not find a listing.Enter a fictitious event date of 22 Nov 1958 to anyone in your family file.

Go to List->Ages, click on the tab for that person and select the box 'Show years and days'. Reunion will tell you that this date was a Saturday.

Close the window and delete the fictitious date

Frank

MHill
01 August 2005, 10:13 AM
If you're using OS X, open Terminal (located in Applications/Utilities folder) and type "cal 1958" (without quotes). Terminal will show you a calendar for the entire year. I use this often, especially when I'm working with church records or obituaries.

Dennis J. Cunniff
01 August 2005, 04:56 PM
open Terminal and type "cal 1958".I thought for sure this would be useless for anything but recent dates, but to my surprise "cal 1752" gets it right, going from September 2 directly to September 14. (Well, right if you're in Britain, anyway).

Not, I think, a replacement for a dedicated calendar program, but very handy if used cautiously!

brandt
27 July 2007, 08:21 AM
It was Pope Gregoire XIII (1572-1585, born 1502) who replaced the Julian calendar (of Julius Caesar) in 1582: Oct. 5 1582 was also Oct. 15 1582.

In Brittain they jumped in 1752 from September 2 directly to September 14; after approx. 200 years they had to add one day extra.
In Russia this 'new calendar' was introduced in 1918; the revolution, started on Nov. 7 1918, is still called the October-revolution.

So handle TERMINAL wth caution indeed; it depends on which date your country accepted the Gregorian calendar.

Bob White
28 July 2007, 03:39 PM
All of us with OSX have iCal and I always have it running. It guides my daily grind! It goes back as far as Dec 27, 999 AD --- which turns out to be a Wednesday. I used to use a little shareware item but this is plenty fast enough.

Open iCal, type command-shift-T and adjust to your desired date. Hit return and the calendar pops to the appropriate month with your day highlighted in medium gray. :)

Mary Arthur
30 July 2007, 06:21 PM
All of us with OSX have iCal and I always have it running. It guides my daily grind! It goes back as far as Dec 27, 999 AD --- which turns out to be a Wednesday. I used to use a little shareware item but this is plenty fast enough.

Open iCal, type command-shift-T and adjust to your desired date. Hit return and the calendar pops to the appropriate month with your day highlighted in medium gray. :)

It does not solve the problem stated - what do you do about dates prior to the mostly European correction of 1582 or the British & territories 1752 or in France in the late 1700's and early 1800's or Russia in 1918 or . . .

Dennis J. Cunniff
30 July 2007, 07:34 PM
It does not solve the problem stated - what do you do about dates prior to the mostly European correction of 1582 or the British & territories 1752 or in France in the late 1700's and early 1800's or Russia in 1918 or . . .

One approach is to look up the date the location switched to Gregorian reckoning in the excellent calendar resource found at http://www.tondering.dk/claus/calendar.html.

Bob White
01 August 2007, 02:34 PM
It does not solve the problem stated - what do you do about dates prior to the mostly European correction of 1582 or the British & territories 1752 or in France in the late 1700's and early 1800's or Russia in 1918 or . . .
True but I rarely ever figure out a long ago day of the week for genealogy purposes, so this method works for me.