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Michael Talibard
10 April 2009, 04:25 AM
May I ask for opinions on the vexed questions raised by spelling mistakes, especially of names, in official documents?

When three or four variant spellings of an individual

theKiwi
10 April 2009, 11:42 AM
One method I use is to cater for varied spellings is to use a construction like

Moffat or Moffitt or Mophet

for the Surname.

This can look a bit ugly, but the huge advantage is that a search on the Surname field for any single variant will find the person no matter which variant is searched for.

If in the circumstance you're talking about the only use of the messed up spelling is that one document it could go into a Note, or an "Alternate Name" field, but if there's likely to be confusion in a number of places, and with names of descendants then having the variants easily findable in the one field makes sense - both for you, and for anyone else searching your data if it's published to the web.

Roger

Al Poulin
10 April 2009, 10:35 PM
One method I use is to cater for varied spellings is to use a construction like

Moffat or Moffitt or Mophet

for the Surname.

Using a multiple spelling construction in the surname field seems an attractive solution to a problem that I find in many cases. In addition to this solution, or using a Note, or using an Alternate Name field, does anyone have other suggestions? I am particularly interested in how researchers of French Canadian families deal with the problem for the purposes of Reunion and the web. For publication, the common practice seems to be to normalize on one spelling, perhaps with an alternate spelling noted, and sometimes even ignoring the spelling on the original records.

I was born in a bilingual family in the state of Maine (USA, not France). My ancestry is entirely French, both French Canadian and Acadian. In the 16th through 19th centuries before widespread use of printed materials and formal education, parish priests and civil notaries were the principal users of the pen for record keeping. I believe they tended to phonetically spell persons' names according to what they heard. And what they heard varied by locality and time. One example is a family line where the surname was rendered as Guyon, Gyon, Hion, H

Karen Peters
18 April 2009, 09:28 PM
[QUOTE=Michael Talibard]
When three or four variant spellings of an individual

Normand Frenette
27 April 2009, 11:00 PM
[QUOTE=Michael Talibard]May I ask for opinions on the vexed questions raised by spelling mistakes, especially of names, in official documents?

Linda G
28 April 2009, 11:32 AM
I created a NameEvidence note field. In it I record the name exactly as it appears in each source (or what my eyes 'see' LOL) along with a source citation. I end up with a list, chronological, because I also note the year along with the name.

The 'normal' Reunion name fields reflect my current thinking/judgement. There are no citations associated with these fields.

For info about the evolution of the name, I would look in the note field. For complicated situations where I want to explain my reasoning or whatever to others (or my future self), I would write explanations (also with citations). Not sure where I'd store it--either at the top of the NameEvidence note, or create another NameNote. As you can see, I'm still primarily in evidence collecting phase. My brief 'assessments' (notes to self) are in the NameEvidence note and probably aren't that coherent for someone else's eyes. Later, for sharing purposes, I may put a more polished explanation in another note so it would be easy to include in a user-defined layout.

This does not solve the problem of creating lists or indexes with cross-references. It would be nice to be able record 'see also' names, so those xrefs could be automatically generated, rather than inserted manually later, if important to the Reunion user.

Al Poulin
29 April 2009, 06:48 PM
My solution has been to use the baptismal name as Michael does as the first indexed name, with the various variants consigned to the notes and the 'final' 'common' name in parentheses. The parentheses help to mark the transition from one form to another.

But the history of names (and spelling and grammar) reminds us that there is never just one 'right', way to do things.

Merci, Normand!

Michael Talibard
06 May 2009, 04:21 AM
[QUOTE=Normand Frenette]'Ne scavoire sign