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FRED DYKHUIZEN
15 July 2005, 06:15 PM
Came across a relative who lived in Boarquinon, France (b1742) with a "NPFX" (prefix?) of "St.".....shown as "St. Eloi Daubard". He married Rose Carlos.... and they had seven children. Records are from an LDS microfilm.

Can anyone tell me what the prefix "St." means.....surely not "saint"?

Fred Dykhuizen
fdyk@earthlink.net

Derrick
18 July 2005, 05:36 PM
Came across a relative who lived in Boarquinon, France (b1742) with a "NPFX" (prefix?) of "St.".....shown as "St. Eloi Daubard". He married Rose Carlos.... and they had seven children. Records are from an LDS microfilm.
Can anyone tell me what the prefix "St." means.....surely not "saint"?It can, though it doesn't mean the person is a saint. My favorite examples is a James Bond film where Roger Moore as James Bond poses as "Saint John Smythe," pronounced "sin-jin smythe." This was his last name, however; in that case the prefix might be misplaced (not a surprise in some LDS records).

Secondly, I have seen lots of texts which heavily abbreviate regular names; "Jo" is "John" for instance. "St." might then be "Stephen"? I would only guess this alternative if you see that abbreviation is customary in your record.

Derrick

Shelley Monson
18 July 2005, 06:47 PM
Came across a relative who lived in Boarquinon, France (b1742) with a "NPFX" (prefix?) of "St.".....shown as "St. Eloi Daubard". He married Rose Carlos.... and they had seven children. Records are from an LDS microfilm.
Can anyone tell me what the prefix "St." means.....surely not "saint"?Yes, it usually does mean "Saint" - there are many surnames which are "Saint Blank." I do not think that the "Stephen" theory is valid, because your person is in France. That sort of forename abbreviation is very English.

Many French surnames have migrated to England and become changed over the centuries; for example, the French name "St. Maur" has become "Seymour."

FRED DYKHUIZEN
19 July 2005, 09:13 PM
Yes, it usually does mean "Saint" - there are many surnames which are "Saint Blank." I do not think that the "Stephen" theory is valid, because your person is in France. That sort of forename abbreviation is very English.

Many French surnames have migrated to England and become changed over the centuries; for example, the French name "St. Maur" has become "Seymour."Thanks for your insight. Seems St. Eloi Daubard came to America (Plaquimines, LA) directly from France.

Three of his sons fought in The Battle Of New Orleans 1814-15....3rd Regiment of the Louisiana Militia.

LDS shows "St." as a separate "NPFX"? ....with given name Eloi and surname "Daubard". ..... Fred