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Justin J. Rebbert
08 September 2008, 10:46 PM
I'm new to genealogy and family tree making. I hope I'm off on the right start with Reunion! I have some questions about how certain things are done that I'm hoping you all can help me with.

1. If a cousin has married someone with children from a previous marriage, should those children be entered into my family file? What about the other parent?

2. Is the general practice of family history research to go straight up from parents to grandparents to great-grandparents and so on, and, at each level, going sideways to siblings, then down those lines to find cousins?

Again, I'm totally new to this, so I imagine I must sound pretty stupid. Hopefully, and with this community's guidance, I'll get right into the groove of this! I'm sure I'll have more questions later.

SGilbert
09 September 2008, 12:57 AM
There's no set way to start, and you'll NEVER finish!

Add your information as you get it.

My philosophy is to seek blood relatives, but add any & all info that "falls in your lap". That included previous marriages, adoptions, divorces, etc.

It all seems quite daunting at 1st, but it will all fall into place quite soon.

Michael Talibard
09 September 2008, 04:47 AM
I agree with SGilbert: there

Gary F
09 September 2008, 07:44 PM
Justin,
As the others have said, there's no right way and a lot depends on how interested you are in finding cousins, etc. Personally, I concentrate on direct lines and, like SGilbert, collect the others if the fall into my lap.

Regarding your first question:

1. If a cousin has married someone with children from a previous marriage, should those children be entered into my family file? What about the other parent?

Reunion lets you list multiple marriages for any one person. So you would handle this situation by listing the "someone" with his/her first spouse. The children would be listed here under that marriage. Then the marriage to your cousin is listed as a second spouse. Hope that makes sense . . .
- Gary

AE Palmer
09 September 2008, 10:46 PM
I'm new to genealogy and family tree making. I hope I'm off on the right start with Reunion! I have some questions about how certain things are done that I'm hoping you all can help me with.


Welcome to a very rewarding adventure! As others have said, there is no one set way of recording your data, Reunion will, however, help you organize it in an intelligent fashion.


1. If a cousin has married someone with children from a previous marriage, should those children be entered into my family file? What about the other parent?


Cousin, or not, anytime a person has multiple marriages, you should enter ALL spouses and their respective children. After all, that is how half-siblings are recorded.


2. Is the general practice of family history research to go straight up from parents to grandparents to great-grandparents and so on, and, at each level, going sideways to siblings, then down those lines to find cousins?

That is the general idea. That said, there is no set pattern. Frequently there will be gaps in the lists of siblings. Most of us who have been at this for a while have had numerous surprises as long lost siblings get connected out of the blue, as well as some long standing family legends completely destroyed!

As long as you enter your data correctly, these links take care of themselves. Furthermore, it is customary to enter females with their MAIDEN (and NOT married) name.

Lastly, be sure to check out both of Elizabeth Shown Mills books on proper methods of sourcing and citations before entering lots of data. It is MUCH easier to correct improper entries while the data is in its infancy.

STEVE
10 September 2008, 09:22 AM
I'm new to genealogy and family tree making. I hope I'm off on the right start with Reunion! I have some questions about how certain things are done that I'm hoping you all can help me with.

Justin, Before you begin entering names and other data into Reunion (an excellent choice for beginner or "professional") may I suggest a little research... Reading some of the threads of ReunionTalk will provide a wide range of answers, and, better yet, the questions that go with them. There are various genealogy books for beginners. Various Jr. Colleges, Colleges, and Family History Center (FHC) locations offer beginners courses and orientations. Finding a club or group of other genealogists in your area can provide answers, support and even lifelong friendships.

Orginize what you have on paper for the nonce. Be patient and you will be well rewarded.

1. If a cousin has married someone with children from a previous marriage, should those children be entered into my family file? What about the other parent?

That said, begin at the beginning, with yourself. Then your parents, siblings. add in your wife(s) and offspring of your union(s). Then you can start working backwards "one generation at a time."

Following this protocol, your case becomes simple. 2) Create a family card for the couple. 3)add her kids to the second famiy card. If your cousin "accepts" or "adopts" any of those children, then duplicate the child buttons on the first card.

2. Is the general practice of family history research to go straight up from parents to gr

yrp!!!

Again, I'm totally new to this, so I imagine I must sound pretty stupid. Hopefully, and with this community's guidance, I'll get right into the groove of this! I'm sure I'll have more questions later.

Jan Powell
11 September 2008, 09:38 AM
1. If a cousin has married someone with children from a previous marriage, should those children be entered into my family file? What about the other parent?
I generally enter the children on the family card of their parents, then duplicate them on the to family card of the new relationship(s). I find that this make it easier for me to keep track.


2. Is the general practice of family history research to go straight up from parents to grandparents to great-grandparents and so on, and, at each level, going sideways to siblings, then down those lines to find cousins? .
For me, I started with me and worked backwards, as recommended. As I found great-grandparents and their siblings (on censuses, for example) I added them, and their spouses and any of their children. I got to a point, though, when other people on my tree sent me info about their descendants, (many of whom are not really relations of mine, except that they are on some distant branch of the tree) of having to decide what the purpose of my research is. I am interested in looking backwards, so I made a cut-off point. Anyone who is descended from my grandparents' generation who I don't personally know and am not likely to meet has been entered in their grandparents notes - I created a note called "Children" to put that info in.

STEVE
12 September 2008, 03:44 AM
I generally enter the children on the family card of their parents, then duplicate them on the to family card of the new relationship(s). I find that this make it easier for me to keep track.

I do not duplicate the child cards unless there is specifically a reason to do so. i.e.; the new parent adopts the children. the children live with the new couple, etc.

STEVE

John Yates
12 September 2008, 12:15 PM
Lastly, be sure to check out both of Elizabeth Shown Mills books on proper methods of sourcing and citations before entering lots of data. It is MUCH easier to correct improper entries while the data is in its infancy.

Once again, it sure would be great if Reunion/Leister would commit incorporate that. With only comma delimiters, it is impossible to define Mills style other than using a free form for each and every one of them each and every time. To me, this is the greatest shortcoming of Reunion and has prevented me for the last 6 months from starting to use it while I work out a postprocessing program to accomplish what is needed, and define my own Mills style references in it. The 1500 people I have in FTM can't be moved to Reunion until that is done. To me, the program I use is much less important than being properly able to represent the evidence data. Moving to Mac and not refusing to use a Windows emulator has left me without a program that is Mills capable out of the box. As it is, if another company announces a Mills aware program on Mac, I'm going there. It would be nice to hear from Leister whether they are going to continue to ignore Mills or not. No statement tells me not.

AE Palmer
12 September 2008, 07:14 PM
Once again, it sure would be great if Reunion/Leister would commit incorporate that.

I agree completely! In this case being firstest with the mostest [being E.S. Mills compliant] would be a real plus for Reunion and Leister, Inc.

It would be nice to hear from Leister whether they are going to continue to ignore Mills or not. No statement tells me not.

'No statement tells me not.' NOT!!!!!!!!!! Leister folks rarely (if ever) publicly commit to additions to the next version until they are ready to release it. Granted, it would be nice to know it they are working on such an addition, but those of us who invested in Reunion have learned to be patient. In the end, the Leister folks find a way to incorporate the best ideas we (as customers) ask for. And being E.S. Mills compliant is on the top of many wish lists to be sure.

Jan Powell
13 September 2008, 07:39 AM
I do not duplicate the child cards unless there is specifically a reason to do so. i.e.; the new parent adopts the children. the children live with the new couple, etc.STEVE
Absolutely! I should have said that, but just took it for granted. Silly me. I link only when I have proof that the children are living in the new relationship as shown on the census, or whatever.

Jan Powell
13 September 2008, 08:15 AM
I agree that sources should always be entered for data, right down to recording a conversation or telephone call. It is important that we know where we got our information from, and that we are able to find the information again, when necessary.
[Politely]I think that people are getting too hung up on there being only one way of source/citation recording - the Shown Mills book. Whilst it is nice to be able to have such a book (if your spending priorities allow it, say), it is important that we remember why we are recording our sources - proof and ability to go back to them. I found one web site (amongst many others) that is a real help:
http://www.genealogy.com/19_wylie.html
You'll see that Shown Mills is included as a reference amongst other authors.
I really like that I can define my own sources in Reunion using existing fields or creating my own fields. This gives me real flexibility. I would hate to be constrained in this ability. As far as I know, there is no limitation to the number of sources a person can create in Reunion, so I just keep creating and adapting as the need requires.
(With apologies if I have missed the point of the source citation discussion.)

John Yates
13 September 2008, 10:14 AM
I really like that I can define my own sources in Reunion using existing fields or creating my own fields. This gives me real flexibility. I would hate to be constrained in this ability.

I don't think any of the Mills advocates are suggesting that you can't define, create, or use any definitions you have now or would want to create. I'm not. TMG asks you at install if you want to use Mills style, and if so, set it all up for you. You don't have to use it even then. But it is the gold standard of genealogy sourcing. There are many of us that want to use it. Current Reunion actually prevents it (with only ','s as delimiters). I understand Legacy (no Mac version, :-( ) now allows it. A local LDS researcher I run into at Historical Societies and meetings bought Legacy and tells us all "Now I can do sourcing the way I want! I love it!". And I point out to all at these meetings that Reunion can't do it. It would be nice to know if they will. Meanwhile, I must give a public thumbs down to Reunion at these meetings because of this. It needs to catch up.

Karen Peters
13 September 2008, 03:59 PM
Again, I'm totally new to this, so I imagine I must sound pretty stupid. Hopefully, and with this community's guidance, I'll get right into the groove of this! I'm sure I'll have more questions later.

Justin,

The only stupid questions are the ones you don't ask.

I would advise you to talk to the oldest members of your family. They might have information that you can't find anywhere else. Try to get them to identify the people in any old photos that are in the family. It's a good way to get people talking.

Try to keep track of your sources, but don't get bogged down in minutiae. The important thing is for you to be able remember where you got your information or for someone else to find it if the source is public.

Good Luck and Have Fun!

MarilynKay
13 September 2008, 07:38 PM
Welcome. Just a word about something that helped me enormously...I had originally intended to just go right up the line

Peter W
21 December 2008, 01:08 PM
[QUOTE=John Yates]

John Yates
21 December 2008, 05:42 PM
At the Genealogy meetings that I attend I find more and more members excited about Mills style source referencing, even before I get to tell them about it. I do point out that Reunion can't do it (at least yet, and no commitment). My comments caused a LDS volunteer, who had previously encouraged me to stick with FTM a year ago when I told her I was moving to TMG, to tell me a month ago that she moved to Legacy and its Mills sourcing and is so happy she did!

I first learned FTM and got to 1500 people in it. Then I learned about more proper sourcing, and evaluated and started to move to TMG. But my strategic goal of fully abandoning Windows was realized a year ago. No current native Mac Genealogy program does Mills aware sourcing, to my knowledge. So none of my tactical program choices fit my strategic goal.

Therefore, I have abandoned my Genealogy data entry until one does. (my project of "forcing" Reunion to do it may remain on hold; I realize if Reunion does deliver it, I would once again have to redo all my sources. sigh! and I am watching as more and more vendors come on board) I personally believe that it is a much more required feature than almost any other, so I'll move to the first program that is say, three out of five stars, if it does this sourcing adequately, and promises to achieve a large enough market share to survive.

I'm disappointed that I have to abandon data entry, but I have many interests, and it can wait. What I've found so far won't be lost, it is in boxes and other printouts. I've found a rich history in my ancestry. The Mayflower Society has just approved my line to William Brewster. No program was required nor harmed for me to obtain and document that proof.

Tom Robinson
23 December 2008, 05:12 PM
Meanwhile, I must give a public thumbs down to Reunion at these meetings because of this. It needs to catch up.
I find it disturbing you're recommending people avoid Reunion because it's missing one feature which is on your personal 'must have' list.

To me the most important aspect of presenting data is that people can follow it--which is possible using Mills, the built-in Reunion source fields, or me typing something into a freeform field. And in reality the readers of my books rarely visit the sources section, let alone worry about what order the fields are in and if there's commas between them.

Anyway, I'm sure your wish has been noted by Leister and they're weighing it up along with the other posts in the wish list forum.

PhilJames1960
31 December 2008, 06:16 PM
Great advice here. I'll just add my over-arching guiding theory, which I haven't seen anyone say: I'd like to expand my tree in ALL directions, out to at least one non-blood relative in "every" direction, out to where I know someone is tracking THAT family, and make note of that. My blood first cousin's wife's family? Yes, I want her name, her parents, and siblings, and that's pretty much all, if I know someone is charting her family, and I'll make note of that. Thus creating a complete web, someday...


I'm new to genealogy and family tree making. I hope I'm off on the right start with Reunion! I have some questions about how certain things are done that I'm hoping you all can help me with.

1. If a cousin has married someone with children from a previous marriage, should those children be entered into my family file? What about the other parent?

2. Is the general practice of family history research to go straight up from parents to grandparents to great-grandparents and so on, and, at each level, going sideways to siblings, then down those lines to find cousins?

Again, I'm totally new to this, so I imagine I must sound pretty stupid. Hopefully, and with this community's guidance, I'll get right into the groove of this! I'm sure I'll have more questions later.