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Sylvia
27 June 2005, 05:16 PM
I am curious about an abbreviation that occurs in a few of the boxes in my descendant chart. The births and deaths are preceded by b. and d. which meaning is quite clear. However, I have noticed that if I have only the place of the death without the year, the death date is preceded by dp. What does this stand for? I know how to edit it out in the chart but I am just curious to know what it means. Can anyone enlighten me?

David G. Kanter
27 June 2005, 05:55 PM
. . .I have noticed that if I have only the place of the death without the year, the death date is preceded by dp. What does this stand for?Death Place. (If you go into Options->Define->Person Fields->Events, you'll see the "short abbreviations" that apply to each of the three parts of each Event entry.)

I know how to edit it out in the chart but I am just curious to know what it means.I would suggest you not edit it out as it serves the purpose of explicitly identifying the situation of not having anything in the date field of the Death Event.

FWIW, I prefer to enter a "?" as the Death Date if a person is known to be dead, but there is nothing known about the Death Date, not even an "about", "before", or "after" date, or a range of dates

STEVE
29 June 2005, 12:06 AM
[QUOTE=David G. Kanter]Death... FWIW, I prefer to enter a "?" as the Death Date if a person is known to be dead, but there is nothing known about the Death Date, not even an "about", "before", or "after" date, or a range of dates

theKiwi
29 June 2005, 12:28 AM
Either we need a special datapoint to indicate aliveness... or we simply need to teach Reunion that "after" means "after... these folks are alive at this time."Or you could create a Custom Event called Living and put your 3 Dec 2000 into that, so that you know at least at 3 Dec 2000 they were living. Change that date each time you have dinner with them.

The problem with teaching Reunion what "after" means is just how far "after" is "after"?

Is it the 1-3 days common between death and burial dates, or is it 10 years in the case of your 90 year old grandfather, or 90 years in the case of your 10 year old grand-daughter?

Roger

genealogist.lily
29 June 2005, 07:06 PM
If I know someone is alive (especially the elderly) I like to enter aft. 3DEC2000. Now, the problem here is that Reunion automatically assumes that the person is now dead. NO. All I'm saying is that I know they were alive on 3Dec2000, I had dinner with them! I don't think the death field is an appropriate place for discussing the living. My "solution" is to use the "Resides" field.

Resides: 3 Dec 2000 Ohmaha NB Says it all: Living. When. Where.

Often an obit will list children and where they live. I add the "cards" and include the date and place. Sometimes I let the various "locations" build, at other times I change them to the newest information. But the "Resides" field can be the most up-to-date information that I have on a person. ~ Lily

Ginny Pannier
30 June 2005, 05:26 PM
My "solution" is to use the "Resides" field.

Resides: 3 Dec 2000 Ohmaha NB Says it all: Living. When. Where.I have an event called "Residence" that I put the date and place I know where someone is currently living. I'm not sure if that field was there or if I created it.

Ginny

David G. Kanter
30 June 2005, 05:47 PM
Which, roundabout, brings us to my favorite wish-list item. . .Either we need a special datapoint to indicate aliveness... or we simply need to teach Reunion that "after" means "after... these folks are alive at this time."I recommend readers of this thread
see the thread entitled "Dates" that STEVE started in the Wish List Forum (http://www.reuniontalk.com/showthread.php?t=426). I suggest that is a better place for further discussion regarding STEVE's interest in another use of the Death Date entry as I find that is "off topic" from what this thread addressed. (You'll see there that I and others have chimed in as being against his proposal.)

Anthony Lewis
30 June 2005, 08:55 PM
There is a genealogical abbreviation fl. (floreat) which indicates that the person was alive at tha time (and place, if you desire to add that). I put these data in the notes field. I think it is confusing to put them in the "Death" field.

It's clear that some people interpret "After" to mean that the person was alive at that date and is now dead. Others just interpret is as knowing the person was alive at that date. Whatever method a particular researcher uses should avoid ambiguity.

Anthony Lewis

STEVE
01 July 2005, 03:02 AM
I don't think the death field is an appropriate place for discussing the living. My "solution" is to use the "Resides" field.

Resides: 3 Dec 2000 Ohmaha NB Says it all: Living. When. Where.

Often an obit will list children and where they live. I add the "cards" and include the date and place. Sometimes I let the various "locations" build, at other times I change them to the newest information. But the "Resides" field can be the most up-to-date information that I have on a person. ~ LilyThe only real problem with this (to me) is that I don't look in the "resides" field when checking on someone's state of being. And, normally, I doubt if most people would consider doing so. This is a really good idea, it just doesn't work for me as well as a "life status" entry.

STEVE

martha
02 July 2005, 02:11 AM
I have an event called "Residence" that I put the date and place I know where someone is currently living. I'm not sure if that field was there or if I created it.I use that, too. The field is native to REUNION, thanks be! I might have ten or twelve different residence fields following people as they moved around, or as a notation of their last siting. I have "Residence" as one of the fields that show up on the family card that is clearly visible without opening the card.

Martha Lev-Zion