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S McCormick
24 May 2008, 09:12 PM
As I have been posting in the Using Reunion 9 section, my first active "research" for my over 2000 person entries in my family files has been to verify the place names that have shown up in the data supplied to me by a distant cousin, as well as the hear-say data which I am supplying myself.

The questions in the Reunion 9 section involve how Reunion handles the mechanics. I have come here to learn what other genealogists wish to know when/if I share my data.

Question 1: I have several towns that are in more than one political division: an example would be Mogadore, Ohio is both Portage County and Summit County. Is there a preferred way to record data such as this.

This sort of location even applies to a family farm which is the birth place or place of death of several members of my mother's family. The farm was in both Jefferson County and St. Louis County, Missouri. I feel that this information will need to be notated at some point. (I do not have much verified data on my mother's family; so I'm not actively listing them at this time.)

Question 2: Place names change: an example would be Newville, Ohio in Richland County, Ohio. Wikipedia's copy of Ohio official records lists this as a defunct village.
Another example would be the cemetery where many of my mothers' family members were buried. The cemetery has been moved, so the location on the death certificates will not lead people to the current location (which has not yet been established; but my sister and I both remember that my mother visited the new location and reported that all family graves were in good order, so presumably they are still there).

My current choice would be to list these places as they were named at that time with a notation directing other researchers to the current locality. (I seem to recall that this has been discussed elsewhere, but not in connection with question 1.)

Are there standard genealogical procedures which I should be following in either or both of these instances?

Sue

Karen Peters
25 May 2008, 03:14 PM
Well,

I don't know about standards, but I try to use the name as it was at the time of the event and put the present day location in square brackets, such as:

Born: 1849 Greenup Co., Ky [Boyd Co., KY]

This is helpful because the records of the event (if there were any) could be located in the original county seat, but the physical location (and where you would look for later records, like the census) would be somewhere else.

If a grave was moved, I record the re-burial as a burial event and put a note in the memo field "moved." Such as:
Burial: aft 17 Dec 1695, Gov. Caleb Carr Ground, Newport, [Newport Co.], RI
Burial: 8 Sept 1900, Gov. Caleb Carr Lot, Jamestown, Newport Co., RI, moved.

If a town were in two counties, I suppose I would put it like this:
Mogadore, Portage Co. and Summit Co., OH.

Remember, the important thing is what makes sense to you and what system you can work with.

Good Luck,

S McCormick
26 May 2008, 12:39 AM
Karen,

Thank you for your prompt reply. This is just the sort of information I was looking for. The way you have listed these items makes sense to me as I read back what you have written. (I was afraid that I would make an entry that turned out to be meaningless to others, and perhaps even to me at a later time.)

You have supplied a note form that will convey the information to others and will also remain clear to me in the future.

Sue

AE Palmer
27 May 2008, 07:20 PM
//cut //

Question 1: I have several towns that are in more than one political division: an example would be Mogadore, Ohio is both Portage County and Summit County. Is there a preferred way to record data such as this.

My suggestion is to use the place name that most resembles the original name. That is to say, if a birth certificate indicates Portage County, then use that one. Presumably you are creating proper citations for these events and facts. If so, you can use the citation detail field to indicate that there may also be data in Summit County.

For that matter, it is entirely possible to create a special source indicating that such-and-such location transends two (or more) policital boundaries at the same time. Once this source is made, it is a simple matter of attaching it to the data in question.



// cut //

Question 2: Place names change: an example would be Newville, Ohio in Richland County, Ohio. Wikipedia's copy of Ohio official records lists this as
a defunct village.
// cut //

My current choice would be to list these places as they were named at that time with a notation directing other researchers to the current locality. (I seem to recall that this has been discussed elsewhere, but not in connection with question 1.)

Are there standard genealogical procedures which I should be following in either or both of these instances?

Sue
SOP (standard operating procedure - if not the defacto standard) is to ALWAYS use the original place name! If you have trouble keeping tabs of name / time frame issues, simply use an external program (word, excel FileMaker Pro, etc.) to track the changes. Of course, having such a list will be handy whenever you are ready to create your magum opus (family history.)

I should add that while I have a number of examples of place name changes in North America, this problem becomes an enormous issue once you start hunting in Europe. Any one location may have changed its political jurisdiction dozens of times over the millennia! Thus, it becomes imperative for a researcher to track these changes carefully.

S McCormick
27 May 2008, 11:31 PM
Again, thank you to AE Palmer. This is exactly the type of help I'm looking for. (I especially like the idea of keeping these changes in a database.) My instinct was to go with the original names, but to track the changes in some manner.

But I'm such a newbie, that I feared my "instinct" might lead others astray. Thanks to your help and that of Karen, I feel that I am on much firmer ground.

Thank you again for your timely help,

Sue