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Frank
13 June 2005, 04:07 PM
Greetings,

I'm sure many of you heard of Apple's announcement at last week's WWDC. We've received some inquiries on the subject from users, as it relates to Reunion, so I wanted to make a comment.

If you haven't been a Reunion user for a long time, it's important to know that we've been developing Mac software since the days of the MacPlus, teeny onboard RAM, OS6, and floppy disks. We've managed to pull through Apple's big changes in the past, such as introducing the PowerPC and OSX.

Apple's plan to transition from PowerPC chips to Intel chips over the next two years is another big change. But there's no reason to expect that we won't handle this change too. The transition will have some impact on the development of Reunion. For example, it will entail more work for us.

As Reunion users, the most important thing to realize is that we've been around the block a few times. We've faced big changes from Apple before. We've responded to and embraced those changes.

martha
14 June 2005, 02:52 AM
Yes and we are the very happy recipients of your hard work. One thing about REUNION: you know you can count on it and its support could not be better or more sensitive. Kudos to Leister and the gang!!

Martha Lev-Zion
Israel

Frank Mitchell
17 June 2005, 03:02 AM
Apple's plan to transition from PowerPC chips to Intel chips over the next two years is another big change. But there's no reason to expect that we won't handle this change too.It never even occurred to me to doubt it !

cponeill
30 June 2005, 02:22 PM
I'm sure many of you heard of Apple's announcement at last week's WWDC. We've received some inquiries on the subject from users, as it relates to Reunion, so I wanted to make a comment. . .You also developed a Windows version of Reunion in the early life of Reunion. Since Mac seems to be headed toward Intel chips, and therefore toward probable increased compatibility with PC platforms, how about Reunion reintroducing a PC (Windows) version of Reunion. I have had a Mac on my desk since 1985 - but since Mac abandoned me and my hardware in switching from OS9 to OS10 (I have lots of SCSI devices, printers, and scanner that won't work with OS10 - so I am still a hold-out on OS9), I am leaning heavily toward purchase of a Windows machine. I almost purchased iMac a few weeks ago, because it came loaded with Tiger, but the day I was going to make the purchase was the day Apple announced its switch to Intel.

So.. I am now back to seriously considering saying the heck with Apple - but the switch would be easier if I knew Reunion was back in the Windows business.

I use a Mac every day - and I use a Windows PC every day. And I really can't see the continuing chauvinism of a lot of Mac users - Hey - Windows XP works great! and 99% of the world's PC software runs on Windows - not Macs. Almost all the genealogy CDs issued (with a few exceptions) are Windows only usable.


So Leister - How about it? A Windows version again?

Frank
30 June 2005, 02:47 PM
I still think Windows stinks.

Sorry to be blunt... but, because I design the software, I can't imagine designing software for an OS that makes me miserable every time it crosses my path.

To me, there's a huge difference between the Mac OS and any version of Windows that I've ever seen.

cponeill
30 June 2005, 04:30 PM
so I guess the answer is no - no Windows version of Reunion.

oldjim
30 June 2005, 05:50 PM
I still think Windows stinks.I totally agree with Frank and hope that Reunion stays with the Mac as I shall certainly stay with the Mac
j

Steve W. Jackson
30 June 2005, 06:02 PM
I support Frank's stated position! :)

I'd like to add that it's not the processor that makes the Mac distinct from PCs. I use Windows XP every single day in my work, and my "chauvinism" is only strengthened because of it. The Mac OS X environment is hands down superior to it in countless ways. And no other personal computer maker even bothers thinking of aesthesics when designing their systems. Some give it a brief thought after everyone sizzles at Apple's newest inventions, but nobody really puts any effort into it. Apple, meanwhile, wins design awards.

Whoever implied that moving to IA-32 processors would necessarily imply more compatibility between Macs and PCs is sorely uninformed. That just means that a future date will have systems whose machine language is the same. It may indeed mean that Macs could be used to install Windows -- if somebody cared to perform such a sacrilegious act. More importantly, though, for Leister to resume publication of a Windows version of Reunion would be mean great deal more work than this idea seems to suggest. It's not like the existing source code would simply compile and run on a Windows system simply because the processors are alike.

I'm not giving up my Mac any time soon and look forward to a resumption of gains in speed and other things coming from the Intel switch. And I will continue to use the best genealogy software available for ANY platform.

= Steve =

ttl
30 June 2005, 08:49 PM
but since Mac abandoned me and my hardware in switching from OS9 to OS10 (I have lots of SCSI devices, printers, and scanner that won't work with OS10 - so I am still a hold-out on OS9)

I use a Mac every day - and I use a Windows PC every day. And I really can't see the continuing chauvinism of a lot of Mac users - Hey - Windows XP works great! I appreciate the pain of forced obsolescence, but IMHO, using OS 9 instead of OS X when comparing Mac to Windows XP is like making your Mac compete with one arm tied behind its back and sand in its eyes. Not to say XP is horrible (even though it's not my preference), but that OS X is such a leap forward from OS 9.

Out of curiosity, does XP recognize your SCSI devices? I can handle a yes answer. :rolleyes:

nanajoan
01 July 2005, 05:35 PM
As a former IBM DOS user, and a dedicated Mac user since 1985, I wonder why people would ever want to expose themselves to the Windoze environment ~ worms, bugs, viruses, endless patches, ad infinitum! I teach computers and genealogy using Windoze computers, but am a happy camper with 3 Macs at home: a G4 tower; an iBook; and my new G5 iMac! And to top it off, my 1992 HP LaserJet 4M, with an Axis adapter, is still churning out copies from the G5! The move from OS 9 to OSX had a slight learning curve, but I must say that Tiger surpasses anything I have had in the past. And Reunion hums along like the happy camper that I am.

Joan Keith
Sun City Georgetown Texas

Bob White
03 July 2005, 04:02 AM
I support Frank's stated position! :)

I'm not giving up my Mac any time soon and look forward to a resumption of gains in speed and other things coming from the Intel switch. And I will continue to use the best genealogy software available for ANY platform.The license plates on my mini-van read 4VR MAC. Need I say more?

But I will. I am recently retired and spent most of the past twenty years performing and/or administering desktop support of both systems. Take it from me that typical employees (who are not "computer aware" like most members of this forum) learn the Mac system much more quickly with a lots less hand holding, work more efficiently, are much more often able to resolve encountered problems without a call to desktop personnel and are generally happier and much less frustrated with the device that they must use for their work. These benefits are the product of the Mac OS -- not the hardware. Personally, I could care less what kind of chip is in a machine as long as I can use the Mac OS.

dhutch
04 July 2005, 06:24 PM
I'm with Frank, too. I have an older SCSI scanner and a serial/Appletalk LaserJet that still work. The scanner is hooked up to an OS 9 machine--I scan using that machine, then easily copy the file over to a G5 iMac. One thing I've observed over the years is that my old Mac hardware and files are much more compatible with my newer equipment and software than any older Windows files would be.

dannsh
05 July 2005, 07:28 PM
The license plates on my mini-van read 4VR MAC. Need I say more?

But I will. I am recently retired and spent most of the past twenty years performing and/or administering desktop support of both systems. Take it from me that typical employees (who are not "computer aware" like most members of this forum) learn the Mac system much more quickly with a lots less hand holding, work more efficiently, are much more often able to resolve encountered problems without a call to desktop personnel and are generally happier and much less frustrated with the device that they must use for their work. These benefits are the product of the Mac OS -- not the hardware. Personally, I could care less what kind of chip is in a machine as long as I can use the Mac OS.Bob I agree with you 100 %.

cutemartin
16 July 2005, 07:25 AM
More important than the never-ending debate over who's better who's better who's best, what's important for me is that LeisterPro has only so much time. I'd prefer they use that time making Reunion even better for MAC users than developing a version for a platform I'll never use.

Donald W. Moore
19 July 2005, 08:50 AM
If you stay with Macintosh computers, then one day you will buy one with an Intel processor inside. Apple is not switching hardware platforms. Apple is not developing an "Intel" box to compete with a "Macintosh" box. The only thing that is changing is the processor. And that change should be pretty much transparent because of...you guessed it, the operating system. OS X runs on both PowerPC and Intel processors right now. The user experience will be no different.

Don Moore
Virginia Beach, Virginia