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ghsfi
07 June 2005, 10:57 AM
I need opinions: what are the best resources on the web for genealogy? I'm new and need some direction.

johnpritt
07 June 2005, 12:33 PM
Give us a hint: where are you from, where are your family(ies) from, what are you hoping to achieve short term/long term.

Jon MacLeod
07 June 2005, 05:55 PM
Give us a hint: where are you from, where are your family(ies) from, what are you hoping to achieve short term/long term.I like gencircles http://www.gencircles.com/globaltree/

bpanozzo
07 June 2005, 06:13 PM
I need opinions: what are the best resources on the web for genealogy? I'm new and need some direction.If you can afford it, Ancestry is amazing and it seems like they add stuff every day. It is pricy; however, it is the one site I happily pay for.

Beth in Alabama.

philipt18
07 June 2005, 06:49 PM
Well it always pays to start with Cindy's List (http://www.cyndislist.com/). In addition to Ancestry.com mention by others (http://www.ancestry.com) whichis indeed a great, if expensive, site, I recommend checking out Family Search (http://www.familysearch.org/) which is the Internet home of the Family History Library and a great resource.

Other than those, you should post a bit about your family and where they're from if you want more specific sites. For example, if you were Jewish I could recommend many good sites, but I can't help if your family was Irish - although I'm sure someone else on the site could.

Philip

martha
08 June 2005, 01:34 AM
I need opinions: what are the best resources on the web for genealogy? I'm new and need some direction.A lot of where you go depends on what ethnic group, or place of origin you are looking for. jewishgen.org is the best for Jewish genealogy.

Martha

SVass
08 June 2005, 06:27 PM
I need opinions: what are the best resources on the web for genealogy? I'm new and need some direction.If you are in the United States, check with both your city and county library (and their websites). Some have paid subscriptions to Ancestry.Com and other databases so it would be free to you with your library card. sam

jmonty
08 June 2005, 10:30 PM
Definitely check out http://www.familysearch.org. Follow links to see if there is a physical library branch near you. If it's close enough to visit you can use their computers to access paid sites like Ancestry.com for free.

jane in l.a.
11 June 2005, 02:13 PM
1. Cyndi's List <http://www.CyndisList.com>
This has to be at the top of everyone's list

2. USGenWeb <http://www.usgenweb.net> -- they have cemetery and census transcriptions, and great sites by state.

3. Good sites to look up census:
http://censuslinks.com/
http://www.censusdiggins.com
While you're at it, you can print census forms by year from here:
http://www.ancestry.com/save/charts/census.htm

4. Ellis Island - search by surname to find anyone who passed
through Ellis Island:
http://www.ellisislandrecords.org/

5. GenCircles - you have to sign up here -- fast & free - and a
great resource:
http://www.gencircles.com/

6. GeneaNet <http://www.geneanet.org/> -- another good source

7. Transcriptions of immigrant ships: <http://www.immigrantships.net>

8. Bureau of Land Management <http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/> -
GREAT site for finding purchases and sales by your ancestors. In
the green bar, click on 'Search Land Patents'. You can view and
print the original document!

9. Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness <http://raogk.org/> --
indispensible site where you can have someone look up records,
photograph tombstones, etc., in any state. I volunteer my time hear
by doing lookups in genealogy books I own. I have used this site a
LOT -- nice people.

10. Sites that let you search for surnames:
-Steve Morse has one of those "mega-search" websites that is very
good <http://www.stevemorse.org/>;
-GenSearcher <http://www.gensearcher.com/gensearcher.html>;
-Public Records Search <http://www.searchsystems.net/>;
-Rootsweb's Surname search <http://rsl.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/rslsql.cgi>;
-Surname Navigator <http://www.rat.de/kuijsten/navigator/usa/index.html>

11. Social Security Death Index - if they had a Social Security
card, their death would be recorded here, along with the Social
Security number. They have a click-on link to print and mail a
form, or order a copy of the SS record online -- can be quite a
valuable bit of info because they put quite a lot of info on their
application <http://ssdi.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/ssdi.cgi>

12. Vital records (birth/death/marriage):
a. VitalSearch
<http://www.vitalsearch-ca.com/> -- most
of these are free (it states if you must be a member on each link).
If it says "guests may enter here", then type in:
User ID = vitalguest
Password = enjoy

b. Death Records Online
<http://home.att.net/~wee-monster/deathrecords.html>

c. GenLookups <http://www.genlookups.com/marriages/> - they have
transcribed marriage records, and "genealogy angels" who will do
free lookups for you.

d. Birth, Death, Marriage Exchange (BMD): <http://iigs.rootsweb.com/bdm/>

e. Cemetery Junction <http://daddezio.com/cemetery/index.html>

f. Interment.net <http://www.interment.net/> -- the most complete
site I know of for burials.

g. Find-A-Grave <http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi>

h. National Obituary Archive
<http://www.arrangeonline.com/obituary/search.asp> -- they keep
this site amazingly up to date with death records.

13. War veterans:
a. American Battle Monuments Commission <http://www.abmc.gov/> -
veterans since WWI

b. Civil War Rosters by state
<http://www.geocities.com/Area51/Lair/3680/cw/cw.html>

c. Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Search Form
<http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/Personz_Search1.cfm>

c. Treelines <http://www.treelines.com/military.htm> -- links to
just about every war.

d. Ken Jones has one of the best war sites
<http://www.tarleton.edu/~kjones/confeds.html>

14. WorldConnect (another site from Rootsweb)
<http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com>

martha
14 June 2005, 03:08 AM
4. Ellis Island - search by surname to find anyone who passed
through Ellis Island:
http://www.ellisislandrecords.org/



Ellis Island site is impossible to use without going through Steve Morse's wonderful shortcuts. Although they meant well, the transcribers were neither familiar with European handwriting nor European languages and the resulting transcriptions sometimes bear no ressemblance to the original name.

Steve's URL allows you to overcome the rigidity of Ellis Island's site. Go to

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/EIDB/ellis.html

for the direct connection to the Ellis Island forms.

Martha Lev-Zion

Sharon Lunde
24 August 2005, 06:53 PM
A new site that has just opened up is Castlegarden.org.

Records from 1830 to 1913. Fairly easy to navigate. Not Soundex oriented. It is still under construction, but has many records now and is growing.

martha
26 August 2005, 01:03 AM
A new site that has just opened up is Castlegarden.org.
Records from 1830 to 1913. Fairly easy to navigate. Not Soundex oriented. It is still under construction, but has many records now and is growing.You might try Steve Morse's wonderful site for simplifying data entry on this site, on Ellis Island and on a lot more sites. He has invented marvelous work arounds for difficult sites and he has worked out a transliteration from Latin letters to Hebrew and Russian, which, though not perfect, is very good. Try: http://stevemorse.org/

Martha [in Israel]

Peter Cook
27 August 2005, 12:28 AM
A new site that has just opened up is Castlegarden.org.
Records from 1830 to 1913. Fairly easy to navigate. Not Soundex oriented. It is still under construction, but has many records now and is growing.A welcome addition to the resources available on-line, however, the usual caveat applies to this data - it is subject to transcription errors.
Case in point: it lists my grandfather Charles Frederick DUNSTAN as Cahrles F DUNSTAN, chemist. Fortunately I knew the year, so a simple surname only search turned him up. The chemist was in fact his friend Will HOLLAND, who despite a number of searches, does not appear to be listed.
They travelled on the SS Wyoming arriving NY 17 Feb 1881. After spending time in Colorodo, Will returned to the UK in March 1882, while Charles stuck it out until November 1882. The index entry was useful in one respect, it showed that the "Wyoming" travelled from Liverpool via Queenstown (Cobh) in Ireland, a fact not given in grandpa's diary of the trip.

jamegaw
27 August 2005, 05:10 PM
Would appreciate any advice on best website to invest. Been trying to compare Ancestry and Genealogy.com. My primary interest is Irish. But I will also be searching German. I just purchased Reunion 8 and I'm inputing all known local info. Thanks for any help.

oKawa
10 October 2005, 09:16 PM
I haven't done any research for a long time because I lost a lot of computer data. I've been disappointed and kind of gave up. Seeing all these new sites and information is causing me to get the GenBug again. Lucky for me there is a Family History Library not to far from me.

sdengle
10 November 2005, 12:32 PM
Received on another list:
Subject: LDS Digitizing Books, on-line NOW at BYU !!!

A dream coming true. The Family History Library is starting to digitize their book holdings, mostly family histories to date, and they are putting them on-line, fully search able by any word or advanced search combinations. Five thousand plus of these books are on the Brigham Young University Library servers and readily accessible, NOW!

Here is a partial clip of an announcement I just received and I have only made a quick check of how to find them and how to search, but it is very exciting "The LDS Family History Library has announced that it has begun the process of digitizing and making available on the Internet all of the Family History books in their collection. These are primarily books in the "929.273Series" that are currently housed on the first floor of the Family History Library (previously housed on the fourth floor of the Joseph Smith Memorial Building).

At the present time (September 2005), about 5000 books have been digitized and are available, and they have announced that they are adding about 100 titles a week to the on-line collection. Copyright issues are playing a role in determining the order in which they progress through this task; books out of copyright are being done first."

The collection is housed on the web site of the Harold B. Lee Library at BYU
http://www.lib.byu.edu/

The Family History Library material is available at:
http://www.lib.byu.edu/fhc/

Lore
28 November 2005, 12:05 AM
No question about it; the New England Historic Genealogical Society website

http://www.newenglandancestors.org

is the best of the best.

Even if you're not researching New England ancestry, you'll love the membership access to new databases: [paste from NEGHS site]
* Digital Sanborn Maps 1867-1970 - NEW!
Provides digital access to large-scale maps of the eight Eastern States (CT, ME, MA, NH, NJ, NY, RI, VT).
* HeritageQuest Online - NEW!
A new invaluable benefit of membership! NEHGS is pleased to announce an exciting new partnership.
* Early American Newspapers, 1690-1876
Explore your early American ancestors with an outstanding collection of early American newspapers.

Additionally, the actual images of MA vital records 1841-1910 are gradually going on-line -- as of Nov 2005, they're up to 1882.

Additionally, thousands of transcriptions of New England vital records to 1852 are available.

Then, there's the usual SSDI, etc.

Goodbye, Ancestry.com.

Monica
19 December 2005, 06:41 PM
I wish I'd joined Ancestry earlier so that would get my vote.

Also www.rootschat.com
It's free and packed full of friendly people willing to give advice, do look-ups and share information.