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S. Craig
23 May 2005, 06:55 PM
Hello,

I have a little problem, I have some old original documents from my great-grandparents and I would like to digitize them. Problem is they are legal size and my scanner scans maximum letter size.

I have scanned my other documents and managed to save them as a PDF document with our hp scanjet 3970. My question is, is there a way to do this by copy/pasting into another document the 2 pieces?

If so, could someone explain the steps to me. Right now I am waiting for my new G5 iMac and have scanned on my husband's Windoze computer.

Here is what I have in terms of programs:
iBook OSX 10.2.8, G3
iPhoto 2.0.1
Demo of PhotoImpression
Microsoft Office X
Acrobat Reader 6.0
Adobe Photoshop 5.0
OmniPage 8 SE

On the IBM,
we have: Adobe Acrobat 6.0 Professional
Microsoft Office 2003

I am contemplating buying Photoshop Elements 3.0, would it be easier than Adobe Photoshop? I have never really been able to use A. Photoshop and have never taken the time until now to figure out how to use it. I would like to save what I have collected to date.

Also I am getting to a point where I would like to put up a web site (with pictures and document links) and would like to start adding original document scans to the Multimedia window of Reunion.

Thanks in advance for taking the time to explain this to me.

Sherry

dfilpus
23 May 2005, 07:21 PM
You can merge a pair of images in most photo editting software. You can definitely do it in Photoshop, but you need to learn a little about Photoshop. Elements has a Photomerge function, which will merge photos to make panoramas.

First of all, scan both segments of the document at the same resolution. Make sure that there is some of the document in both scans, so you can line things up.

The following will work in any photo editting software:

1. Open both images in the editor.
2. Create a new image which is larger than the complete document.
3. Go to the first image, Select All, and Copy.
4. Go to the new image and Paste. Move the copied image to the appropriate spot in the composite image.
5. Go to the second image, Select All and Copy.
6. Go to the new image and Paste. Move the copied image until the overlapped portion of the text lines up.
7. Crop the image to reflect the complete document.
8. (In Photoshop, Flatten the image)
9. Save in the format desired.

Photoshop uses something called Layers to be able to move the individual images around in the composite image. There are ways to make the Layers transparent so as to make the alignment perfect or you can use the Differencing effect to make the alignment perfect. I use this for merging photos. For documents, don't worry about that.

I do this all of the time to create montages or to merge images of large documents.

S. Craig
23 May 2005, 07:55 PM
Hi and I thank you for the information. I will give it a try.

One other question, when I scan the long sheet in 2 parts (while overlapping), do I save them in a specific format or will PDF be OK before transferring them into Photoshop?

Thanks again,


Sherry

dfilpus
23 May 2005, 10:56 PM
I only use PDF as the last format to save pictures in. I do not think Photoshop 5 can read PDF.

If your scanner software has a TWAIN interface, you can scan directly into Photoshop. You run Photoshop, then under the File menu, use Import, then Twain Acquire. Your scanner software will open, you can preview and then scan, which will then exit back to Photoshop, with the image in a Photoshop window. This is the best you can do for accurate scanning.

If you do not have Twain, check what other file formats your scanner can scan to. TIFF will give a high quality scan and a large file. JPEG will give a lower quality scan and a smaller file. Use the highest quality setting for JPEG. There are other formats that will work, but these are the two most common.

Once you are done in Photoshop, outputting to PDF is fine.

S. Craig
24 May 2005, 07:43 AM
Thanks so much, I can't do any scanning today because I am going to the archives and library but will try this out tomorrow. (And maybe get more to scan)

I thank you again for helping with something sort-of off-topic.

Sherry

John Hill
25 May 2005, 04:40 AM
Here is what I have in terms of programs:
iBook OSX 10.2.8, G3
iPhoto 2.0.1
Demo of PhotoImpression
Microsoft Office X
Acrobat Reader 6.0
Adobe Photoshop 5.0
OmniPage 8 SE


I was a little surprised that nobody has recommended Graphic Converter as a solution to this problem. It has a TWAIN interface that works (for me, and any rate) and is SO useful for straightening, trimming and merging documents - and you can save the result direct to PDF (or a whole raft of other formats) if you so wish.

I frequently need to merge scans this way - UK marriage certificates tend to be long and thin and are impossible to scan in one go.

I've been using Graphic Converter for over ten years now, and have always found Thorsten Lemke extremely helpful when I've hit a problem.

joeswann
25 May 2005, 10:04 AM
Let me start off by saying that I have a lot to learn about image editing. I just saw this and was wondering in The GIMP (http://www.gimp.org/) could accomplish the same thing. Since it is distributed free of charge it is a whole lot cheaper than Photoshop.

dfilpus
25 May 2005, 12:01 PM
Both Gimp and GraphicConverter, along with a number of other image editors, can be used to merge photos by hand.

Gimp is equivalent to PhotoShop, so you can do much more complicated editting than GraphicConverter.

Gimp is free, but requires X11 to have been installed. X11 comes with MacOS 10.3 and above, but may not be installed by default. The X11 interface is more Unix-GUI than MacOS.

Since the OP has Photoshop, it is probably the best option.

GraphicConverter does cost for a license, but it does somethings very well. I use GraphicConverter, PhotoShop and PhotoShop Elements, each for their strengths.

jccaswell
18 November 2012, 06:57 AM
I know this is an old thread but I wanted to post this update for anybody who may be new to scanning and having difficulties with large documents.

One of the improvements in scanners lately has been the implementation of 'automatic document feeders', which gives the user the ability to place several documents at a time on the scanner and scan them as a batch. The problem I faced was that a lot of my documents originate from the UK and are typically 8x14 (legal size), and were too large to be scanned in one pass - or so I thought. Some experimentation with my scanner showed that the scanner's document feeder could scan the legal 8x14 documents by changing the scan settings in software. My scanner is a Canon Pixma 420, but more and more of the scanners manufactured today have the automatic document feeder and I would expect the software supplied would also enable larger documents to be scanned in one pass.

I also found in the software supplied various options to scan a document in multiple passes and stitch the images together, all without touching any photo editing software. I do not know how good the resulting image is, but this again may help somebody.

Hope this helps!

Jon

Bob White
18 November 2012, 03:36 PM
Seven years is forever in computer history. So I will add that one doesn't even need the scanner. You can do perfectly good copies from any number of apps using the camera function of the iPhone, iPod touch or iPad. Most have excellent merge functions built-in. When choosing an app, check to see what control there is over image size of the resulting image and the image file format. Many have choices; some don't.

theKiwi
19 November 2012, 12:14 PM
There are some of us who haven't yet moved into the iPhone/iPad era...

Bob White
19 November 2012, 02:37 PM
There are some of us who haven't yet moved into the iPhone/iPad era...

Actually, I use a scanner mostly. I was just pointing out that there are more options than seven years ago.