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Dave Hales
11 May 2005, 03:53 PM
My query relates more to the behaviour of Mac OSX than to Reunion but I am sure that some knowledgable person on this Forum will be able to help me.
Under OS 9, if one placed a 'Family File' in the Startup folder it would open automatically.
Under OSX including a 'Family File' in the Startup Items appears to have no effect.
If one includes the Reunion application in Startup Items, the application opens as far as the 'Open File' dialog box but thereafter one has to manually navigate to the 'Family File' in order to open it.
I can't believe that OSX is inferior to OS9 in this respect and feel sure that I must be missing something somewhere!! Any help would be appreciated.
I am running Reunion 8.06 and OSX 10.3.9.
Dave Hales

dfilpus
11 May 2005, 04:51 PM
I just ran a test by dragging my Family file to the Startup Items window in the Accounts Pane of System Preferences, logged out and logged back in. The Family file opened just as you would expect. This is with Reunion 8.06 and MacOS 10.3.9.

Bob White
11 May 2005, 09:07 PM
Dave: Reading between the lines, so to speak, I'm guessing that you just updated to OSX. I would do a Repair Permssions and see if that helps out. It's sort of the OSX equivalent of the old desktop rebuild. Go to Applications >> Utilities >> Disk Utility. Start up Disk Utility, choose your disk on the left and click on Repair Permissions. This should be done at least monthly and before and after any system updates.

Dave Hales
12 May 2005, 04:17 AM
Hi Bob
Thanks for your reply but you read more between the lines than was there! I have been using OSX since Jaguar but only recently upgraded Reunion from version 6 which I had been running under Classic.
I also repair permissions regularly - in fact I have a programme installed which does this automatically. So the problem does not lie there.
I am not at my home machine at the moment but when I get home I will try dragging the Family File to the Startup pane as suggested by dfilpus; previously I have been adding it manually by clicking the + button and navigating to the file. I can't understand why it should make any difference but it is worth a try.

Dave Hales
12 May 2005, 10:35 AM
Having dragged the Family File into the Startup Items pane, instead of adding it using the + key, everything now works fine. Very strange!
Thanks dfilpus and everone who replied to my query.

billdav
12 May 2005, 05:50 PM
David,

could you email me at:

william.davidson@sympatico.ca

I'm researching "Hales" in the UK

martha
13 May 2005, 04:23 AM
Having dragged the Family File into the Startup Items pane, instead of adding it using the + key, everything now works fine. Very strange!
Thanks dfilpus and everone who replied to my query.

I just wanted to add one point here, Dave. When you have more than one family file, OSX does not know which one you wish to be the start up file, so it opens up Reunion to allow you to choose. By dragging the family file you wish into the Startup Items window, you made your choice and have relieved the OSX of its conundrum!

Martha Lev-Zion

Dave Hales
16 May 2005, 08:54 AM
I just wanted to add one point here, Dave. When you have more than one family file, OSX does not know which one you wish to be the start up file, so it opens up Reunion to allow you to choose. By dragging the family file you wish into the Startup Items window, you made your choice and have relieved the OSX of its conundrum!Hi Martha
I appreciate what you are saying and was aware of this but the point I was making in my last post was that if I drag the particular family file to the startup pane it opens correctly but if I add it by the alternative method of using the + button, and then selecting the family file, it does not work.
All other applications and documents which I add by this method work correctly.
As I said - very strange!!

Frank Mitchell
17 May 2005, 01:28 AM
Hi Martha
... if I drag the particular family file to the startup pane it opens correctly...

I wonder why you do this. Why not simply put an alias of your family file in the start up folder?

This would make it easier to make routine backups of your data. Or am I missing something?

What I do is keep the icon of my family file in the dock - that way it stays closed until I want it and is simple to open at any time.

Regards,
Frank

Dave Hales
17 May 2005, 07:08 AM
I wonder why you do this. Why not simply put an alias of your family file in the start up folder?

This would make it easier to make routine backups of your data. Or am I missing something?

What I do is keep the icon of my family file in the dock - that way it stays closed until I want it and is simple to open at any time.Hi Frank
I am afraid that a lot of confusion appears to be creeping into this thread. When one drags a file to the startup pane it is not physically moved. All that happens is that a link is created to the original file in the same way that a link is created between an alias and the original file.
As you state, putting an icon in the dock means that the file stays closed until you open it, which is exactly what I do not want to happen. I want the file to open automatically every time I log in.
There are two ways of including a file in the list of startup items - a) by dragging the file to the startup pane and b) by clicking the + button and then navigating to, and selecting, the relevant file.
The only mystery which remains, as far as I am concerned, is why the first method works with my Reunion file but the second does not, whereas both methods work with every other file in my startup list.
This is, of course, now of academic interest only because my problem has been solved by using the first method. My original query arose because automatic startup failed to work as a result of my having used the second (my usual) method of adding the file to the startup list.
Regards
Dave

S. Kennedy
17 May 2005, 10:03 PM
There are two ways of including a file in the list of startup items - a) by dragging the file to the startup pane and b) by clicking the + button and then navigating to, and selecting, the relevant file...Dave,
I just tried the above method b for my My Family File and it opened as expected. Dual 1.25 PM - OS 10.3.8 Reunion 8.0.6.
I haven't tried it but I wonder if this method works if the lock in the panel is not opened before adding the file to the start up list. Were you asked to authorize the change when you used the drag and drop method?

Dave Hales
18 May 2005, 03:02 PM
I just tried the above method b for my My Family File and it opened as expected. Dual 1.25 PM - OS 10.3.8 Reunion 8.0.6.
I haven't tried it but I wonder if this method works if the lock in the panel is not opened before adding the file to the start up list. Were you asked to authorize the change when you used the drag and drop method?Dear S Kennedy
As no-one else uses my computer I do not bother to lock the startup pane so your hypothesis does not provide an explanation I am afraid.
I think I must accept that this strange quirk applies to my machine only and give up trying to solve the mystery.
As I said in an earlier post, it is of academic interest only as the file now opens as I wish it to.

Frank Mitchell
22 May 2005, 05:27 AM
I am afraid that a lot of confusion appears to be creeping into this thread. When one drags a file to the startup pane it is not physically moved. All that happens is that a link is created to the original file in the same way that a link is created between an alias and the original file.
I did understand what you were trying to do, but thought my way of working might be "near enough". Obviously not.

Also, since I never use the startup pane, I had forgotten the behaviour you describe.

Regards,
Frank