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ttubach
25 April 2007, 02:59 PM
So has anyone done one of these? The National Geographic Org. is doing what they call a Genographic project, you can submit a swab (w/your DNA) and they tell you which haplogroup* you belong to. From this you can tell the path your ancestors took to reach their (from the genealogists perspective ) homeland. Its pretty interesting stuff.




* haplogroups are the genetic versions of ethnicity

Betty Miessner
25 April 2007, 07:01 PM
My sister did. We're haplogroup H which is predominant in Western Europe. The maps are truly fascinating.
Betty

WilliamTaber
25 April 2007, 10:28 PM
Yes, I utilized the Genographic project. It placed me on the R1b tree. I later upgraded to the DeepSNP test at FTDNA which refined it to R1b1c6, a sub branch of Haplogroup R1b1c, which according to FTDNA is the most common haplogroup in European populations.

gencea
26 April 2007, 06:37 AM
I did the genographic when it first came out. I'm haplogroup C, which is a asian group. Wansn't surprising since my ggg grandfather was from China. The description of the ancestral journey from africa to china was interesting. If I had more money I'd do a more detailed test and get my mother tested.

Katharine Ott
29 April 2007, 08:49 PM
So has anyone done one of these? The National Geographic Org. is doing what they call a Genographic project, you can submit a swab (w/your DNA) and they tell you which haplogroup* you belong to. From this you can tell the path your ancestors took to reach their (from the genealogists perspective ) homeland. Its pretty interesting stuff.

* haplogroups are the genetic versions of ethnicity


Yes, I did the cheek swab with NGO last year. We females can only test our mitochondrial DNA - remember back to your biology, the mitochondria are the "power house" of the cell, helping it to use oxygen to produce energy. They are contained in the egg cells - the sperm uses its mitochondrial energy to get to the egg , but only the nuclear material enters the egg - so this mtDNA is passed on by the mother to her children. And the daughters pass it on to their children. A son will have his mother's mitochondrial DNA, but he will not pass it on to his children. My haplogroup is Clan V (Velda) which is apparently found in only about 5% of the European population. I believe we are the ones who did the ancient cave paintings found in southern France. :) Very fascinating subject. And I have flagged all the people in Reunion who should test in Clan V.

rod
07 May 2007, 03:38 PM
We've started a small family dna project - the results are at http://www.jewett.org/jewettdna.html . Not yet posted on the page but we have our first dna-match English family member who is not a descendant of the two brothers who came to New England in 1638/9.

rod
07 May 2007, 03:44 PM
My haplogroup is Clan V (Velda) which is apparently found in only about 5% of the European population. I believe we are the ones who did the ancient cave paintings found in southern France. :) Very fascinating subject. And I have flagged all the people in Reunion who should test in Clan V.

I'm a "Velda" too. I did the "full mtdna" test and my results are at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/viewer.fcgi?db=nucleotide&val=107785150

My earliest traceable maternal ancestors lived in England in 1800, but my closest full mtdna match in the world (outside of known family) lives in northern Portugal.

Larry Jelf
01 May 2008, 05:09 PM
We've started a small family dna project - the results are at http://www.jewett.org/jewettdna.html . Not yet posted on the page but we have our first dna-match English family member who is not a descendant of the two brothers who came to New England in 1638/9.
Thank you for sharing your DNA resultds. I'm considering having it done and am still far from certain what info I am going to obtain from it. Your letter and the site included have helped a bit.

Bowes Researcher
18 August 2012, 02:27 PM
Thank you for sharing your DNA resultds. I'm considering having it done and am still far from certain what info I am going to obtain from it. Your letter and the site included have helped a bit.

FYI, the Genographic Project has just introduced Gene 2.0, which will be a far more advanced haplogroup test based on knowledge gained since their first test came out. https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com

Martha