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Steven
16 April 2005, 12:09 PM
I have a Family File of around 37,000 individuals.

Despite having used Reunion for over 10 years now, I've never really played with the Web Family Card function, but in a moment of inspiration I thought I'd give it a go and throw something up on the web.

So I created a Web Card file, but upon checking the size of this file's contents, I see it's 107Mb!! Assuming that to publish the file on the web I need to upload the whole Web Card folder up to my ISP's server, I'm stuck, because my ISP only allows me something like 10Mb. And even if my ISP was more generous, uploading a 100Mb+ folder is a big ask, even on broadband.

I assume the Web Card folder is so large because Reunion seemingly creates a separate file (containing an image) for each Family Card. Whilst it seems that each of these files is only about 4Kb each, there are 26,000 odd familes and so I guess the large all up size.

Am I missing something here, or are the folders simply that large and there's not much I can do about it? Or is there a way to shrink down what I need to upload?

Cheers

Steven

theKiwi
16 April 2005, 02:28 PM
I have a Family File of around 37,000 individuals.

[snip]
I assume the Web Card folder is so large because Reunion seemingly creates a separate file (containing an image) for each Family Card. Whilst it seems that each of these files is only about 4Kb each, there are 26,000 odd familes and so I guess the large all up size.

Am I missing something here, or are the folders simply that large and there's not much I can do about it? Or is there a way to shrink down what I need to upload?

One thing to check on first - I'm sure that the whole thing isn't 107 MB in the terms needed to actually measure what will be uploaded....

Look at the number of bytes that are reported - this is the size that will need to be stored an uploaded, not the number of MB that is reported in the Get Info.

For example, on a set of web cards and person sheets I have here the whole project reports

85.4 MB on disk (40,855,290 bytes)

So I'd need 40 MB of storage space at the ISP to handle this - admittedly still quite a chunk if I had it at an ISP - it's actually served right out from the Mac I'm writing this on.

But I've moved away from Reunion web cards now and am using TNG (http://lythgoes.net/genealogy/) to put my genealogy online. This involves PHP and mySQL and once it's all installed and setup, you upload a single GEDCOM file to it each time you want to update.

You can see my site at the link in my signature. I also run another site on TNG now that used to be on Reunion cards - it was for 65,000 people, and updating that involved moving over 120,000 files to the server. It was about 300 MB in total, but it took a very long time to move it, even over my home network (the server is at home). Now with TNG to update this site I have to move a single ~14 MB GEDCOM file.

So one option would be to check with your ISP to see if they offer PHP/mySQL hosting. Or if you have a broadband connection to your Mac at home (assuming it's running Mac OS X), and only a little bit of bravery, you can do the whole thing right from your own Macintosh as I do.

Cheers

Roger

Steven
16 April 2005, 10:12 PM
One thing to check on first - I'm sure that the whole thing isn't 107 MB in the terms needed to actually measure what will be uploaded....

Look at the number of bytes that are reported - this is the size that will need to be stored an uploaded, not the number of MB that is reported in the Get Info...

But I've moved away from Reunion web cards now and am using TNG (http://lythgoes.net/genealogy/) to put my genealogy online. This involves PHP and mySQL and once it's all installed and setup, you upload a single GEDCOM file to it each time you want to update.Roger, this TNG thing looks great. I want to give it a go - will you be my mentor? :-) I'll email you off line.

I checked the bytes as you said, and in Get Info it says 107.3MB (37,407,040 bytes). I always thought 1,000 bytes = 1Kb, and 1,000Kb = 1Mb. Obviously we;re talking something different here?

Cheers...Steven

theKiwi
17 April 2005, 02:54 AM
I checked the bytes as you said, and in Get Info it says 107.3MB (37,407,040 bytes). I always thought 1,000 bytes = 1Kb, and 1,000Kb = 1Mb. Obviously we;re talking something different here?

Yes - it's to do with the smallest block size that your hard drive has on it. Typically these days this seems to be 4K, so a file of even one byte will take up 4K, and a file of 5K will take up 8K. So the 107.3 you have is the total of the number of blocks used, but not every block is fully used, so you only have 37.4 (approximately) MB of data, and as I said before this is the number of bytes that the ISP is concerned about when measuring file sizes.

And technically 1 KB is 1024 bytes and 1 MB is 1024 KB, but the use of even multiples of 1000 is very common, particularly among drive vendors.

Cheers

Roger

idfitter
17 April 2005, 05:30 PM
But I've moved away from Reunion web cards now and am using TNG (http://lythgoes.net/genealogy/) to put my genealogy online. This involves PHP and mySQL and once it's all installed and setup, you upload a single GEDCOM file to it each time you want to update.Roger

TNG looks good.

A quick question: Does it handle the updated GEDCOM OK, in that any additions to the website (photos/links etc) that TNG can handle are not overwritten or corrupted by the revised GEDCOM?

Steve W. Jackson
18 April 2005, 07:18 PM
Yes - it's to do with the smallest block size that your hard drive has on it. Typically these days this seems to be 4K, so a file of even one byte will take up 4K, and a file of 5K will take up 8K. So the 107.3 you have is the total of the number of blocks used, but not every block is fully used, so you only have 37.4 (approximately) MB of data, and as I said before this is the number of bytes that the ISP is concerned about when measuring file sizes.

And technically 1 KB is 1024 bytes and 1 MB is 1024 KB, but the use of even multiples of 1000 is very common, particularly among drive vendors.

Cheers

Roger

Actually, I recently learned that drive vendors deliberately do not use the 1024-byte measurement method. It matters on a computer because those numbers are powers of two, and binary numbers are at the heart of our systems. But when a drive vendor says a disk drive is 40 GB, they actually do mean 40 billion bytes. Of course, when you put that 40 GB drive on your Mac, it -- being dependent on powers of two -- will give you a "computer gigabyte" measurement of about 37.25 GB. :)

= Steve =

theKiwi
18 April 2005, 08:59 PM
A quick question: Does it handle the updated GEDCOM OK, in that any additions to the website (photos/links etc) that TNG can handle are not overwritten or corrupted by the revised GEDCOM?Yes - as long as within Reunion you haven't done anything that changes the ID number for anyone, when you import another GEDCOM file all TNG created links to a person (photos, headstones, histories for example) remain in place. TNG links them by ID number.

So conversely if for some reason in Reunion you change the match between ID number and person (eg delete a person, then add a new person) then TNG will maintain the extra things linked to that ID number, so you might have things appearing for the wrong person.

Roger