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Lynn Sheren
29 October 2006, 04:14 PM
I am looking to update my scanner. I have had an hp scanjet 4570c for about 4 years. I just purchased an iMac and my hp scanner was not recognized by my new computer. I updated the software for the hp and it worked, but the the new software update, is a step backward from the older version that I had. Bad news.

Between the Epson 4490, Hp, and the Canon 8600 (New), (under 200 dollars) are there any that stand out as far as quality, crisp, clear scans, of documents and photo's? And good software for an iMac? I understand that CIS scanners are not able to do the scan quality that a CCD scanner will do.

If any group would want, quality, crisp, clear scans of documents and photo's, this Reunion group would be it.

If anyone has an opinion and information on scanners, your comments and recommendations are appreciated.

Lynn

marnen
29 October 2006, 06:53 PM
I just bought an HP PSC 1510 all-in-one for about $80. I wouldn't recommend it for use on a network, but if you're only trying to use it with one computer, it seems like a good machine. Print quality is excellent, and (although I haven't used the scanner much) scan quality seems good as well.

I mention this because it's often cheaper to get an all-in-one than it is to get a dedicated scanner these days.

SGilbert
29 October 2006, 08:28 PM
Yes: All-in-one. Never been a fan of HP's software (printers & scanners, OK, but lousy software for mac, at least). Look into an Epson 320 printer/scanner. Great for both. 5 individual colors + black. <$200. Epson.com almost always has "refurbs" for sale. I like them because a person has actually checked them out.

David G. Kanter
29 October 2006, 11:34 PM
I am looking to update my scanner. . .I just purchased an iMac. . . .While, with a desktop computer, it may not be a factor, but I wouldn't overlook the value of having a good-quality portable scanner in case you ever have the need to do scanning "in the field". When I go with my laptop computer to gather family data from other persons, it's a fabulous advantage to have a portable scanner to capture photos and documents in real time--and without having to ask the holder to part, even for a short while, with the original. (Not asking them to let me borrow the original has often been the difference between capturing the content and not getting it at all.) When gathering data in libraries, from keepers of official records, etc., you may not be allowed to scan the documents.

I've been extremely pleased with the Canon CanoScan LiDE 35 flat-bed scanner (http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=ModelDetailAct&fcategoryid=119&modelid=10241). It's powered through the USB connection to my computer (so no power adapter to deal with and they even give you a USB cable), has a 8.5"x11.7" scanning area, has more than sufficient resolution for these purposes, is only 10.1"x1.5"x14.5" in overall size (so it fits in available space in the case I have for my 15" TiPB), weighs only 3.7 lbs, and was priced below US$75.

marnen
29 October 2006, 11:37 PM
Never been a fan of HP's software (printers & scanners, OK, but lousy software for mac, at least).
Yeah, the installer on the PSC 1510 was weird, but the software (mostly) works well, and it came with ReadIris 9, which was nice.

Karen Peters
30 October 2006, 10:31 AM
I recently bought an Epson Perfection 4490 Photo, mostly to scan my old negatives. It has Digital Ice Technology for Film and does a fantastic job getting rid of scratches and dust. :)

The scanner does well on documents too, but the included OCR software (ABBYY FineReader 5 Sprint Plus) is close to useless. Sometimes it gets most of the page OK with a few errors, sometimes it is so bad that it would be faster to type it myself.:(

marnen
30 October 2006, 10:35 AM
Interesting. I've heard very good things about FineReader, so I'm surprised that it doesn't work well. Of course, these good things I've heard have generally been about the current version, which I believe is only available for Windows. If you're using a Mac version of FineReader, it's probably quite old...

Marilynn
30 October 2006, 06:28 PM
Although our scanner is several years old, we have an Epson Perfection 2400 Photo scanner. I think it came with PhotoShop Elements 2. We had to then download the twain driver. Epson help desk is very helpful. They are Mac savy. I agree with others that HP is not supporting Mac as they have in the past.

Marilynn

joeswann
30 October 2006, 07:35 PM
I've got Canon's CanoScan 8400F. It is a bit on the bulky side compared to other models but it does a good job and the software is set up to make several common type os scanning jobs easy. The reason I got this particular model is that it scans slides and 35 mm negatives. There are better scanners for this job out there but I have been pleased with the results with this unit and it is very affordable.

SVass
31 October 2006, 01:17 PM
I strongly suggest that you use your old scanner with a twain and the "Acquire" function in Graphic Converter. Most software that comes with scanners is atrocious. sam

Lynn Sheren
03 November 2006, 06:47 PM
While, with a desktop computer, it may not be a factor, but I wouldn't overlook the value of having a good-quality portable scanner in case you ever have the need to do scanning "in the field". When I go with my laptop computer to gather family data from other persons, it's a fabulous advantage to have a portable scanner to capture photos and documents in real time--and without having to ask the holder to part, even for a short while, with the original. (Not asking them to let me borrow the original has often been the difference between capturing the content and not getting it at all.) When gathering data in libraries, from keepers of official records, etc., you may not be allowed to scan the documents.

I've been extremely pleased with the Canon CanoScan LiDE 35 flat-bed scanner (http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=ModelDetailAct&fcategoryid=119&modelid=10241). It's powered through the USB connection to my computer (so no power adapter to deal with and they even give you a USB cable), has a 8.5"x11.7" scanning area, has more than sufficient resolution for these purposes, is only 10.1"x1.5"x14.5" in overall size (so it fits in available space in the case I have for my 15" TiPB), weighs only 3.7 lbs, and was priced below US$75.

David:

Thanks for your reply. A very good point on having a portable scanner. I have been in that situation more then once, and if I had had a portable scanner with me, I would have left my visit, with some scanned copies of family photo's. A missed opportunity.

Lynn

Lynn Sheren
03 November 2006, 07:22 PM
I recently bought an Epson Perfection 4490 Photo, mostly to scan my old negatives. It has Digital Ice Technology for Film and does a fantastic job getting rid of scratches and dust. :)

The scanner does well on documents too, but the included OCR software (ABBYY FineReader 5 Sprint Plus) is close to useless. Sometimes it gets most of the page OK with a few errors, sometimes it is so bad that it would be faster to type it myself.:(

Karen:

Thank you for your reply and sharing your experience with the Epson 4490 Photo scanner. It is nice to know that it does a good (fantastic) job of scanning. Getting that great scan of a photo does depend on the scanner that you are using. I am down to the Epson 4490 and the Canon 8600. Because of David's comments, I am also thinking about a Canon portable scanner to take on research trips. I don't drink or smoke, so I have to do something. :)

Thanks again,

Lynn

Lynn Sheren
03 November 2006, 07:37 PM
I strongly suggest that you use your old scanner with a twain and the "Acquire" function in Graphic Converter. Most software that comes with scanners is atrocious. sam

Sam:

Thanks for your reply.

I don't know if this is a simple question to a complex problem. Where do I get a correct Twain Driver and "Acquire" function, in Graphic Converter? I never attempted that before. Should I be able to get a Twain Driver for my hp Scanjet 4570c scanner on line and download it to my computer? Should it work better than the originial driver by HP? No problems with the mac OS?

Lynn

Lynn Sheren
03 November 2006, 07:43 PM
A thank you to all that replied to my questions concerning scanners. Every little bit of information helps. It is hard to beat the hand on experiences of others, using their scanners, pros and cons.

Thanks again,

Lynn

Karen Peters
04 November 2006, 10:21 AM
Karen:

Thank you for your reply and sharing your experience with the Epson 4490 Photo scanner. It is nice to know that it does a good (fantastic) job of scanning. Getting that great scan of a photo does depend on the scanner that you are using. I am down to the Epson 4490 and the Canon 8600. Because of David's comments, I am also thinking about a Canon portable scanner to take on research trips. I don't drink or smoke, so I have to do something. :)

Thanks again,

Lynn

Lynn,

You're welcome.

Just to be clear, the digital ICE technology to remove dust and scratches for the Epson 4490 is for film and negative scans only (not photos). You have to shell out an extra $250 to get the Epson 4990 that has digital ice for film and photos. That being said, I am happy with the quality of the photo scans, but I bought the scanner primarily to digitize my negatives.

I hope you're happy with whatever scanner you choose!

Karen

SVass
07 November 2006, 10:42 AM
Sam:
I don't know if this is a simple question to a complex problem. Where do I get a correct Twain Driver and "Acquire" function, in Graphic Converter? I never attempted that before. Should I be able to get a Twain Driver for my hp Scanjet 4570c scanner on line and download it to my computer? Should it work better than the originial driver by HP? No problems with the mac OS?
Lynn
Acquire is under File about halfway down the first column in Graphic Converter and inside that is Twain Acquire. (Photoshop has a similar function.) The HP software should include a Twain module and its install function should put it in the right place. If not, then call or write to HP and ask. They are quite helpful as I complained about their lousy ad copy which called my 5470c scanner "twain compatible" before I bought it and their expert said that the advertising people did not understand the language very well. If you are in the US, the 800 number should be free and email is inexpensive.

Bob White
13 November 2006, 03:00 AM
Lynn,

You're welcome.

Just to be clear, the digital ICE technology to remove dust and scratches for the Epson 4490 is for film and negative scans only (not photos). You have to shell out an extra $250 to get the Epson 4990 that has digital ice for film and photos. That being said, I am happy with the quality of the photo scans, but I bought the scanner primarily to digitize my negatives.

I hope you're happy with whatever scanner you choose!

Karen

I have the 4990. To be perfectly honest, the ICE technology is OK but either it is not as good as advertised or possibly I don't use it correctly. However, the ICE is not the main reason that I settled on the 4990. I settled on it for two reasons. First, it uses Firewire, thus the scans get into my iMac very fast. Second, it comes with plastic holders for all of the common sizes of photos and slides, thus making quick work of scanning multiple items. I have owned seven or eight scanners over the years; this is the most impressive.

idfitter
14 November 2006, 05:32 AM
I used to have a HP 3570C, but ended up uninstalling from my Mac and using it on my PC. The HP software is very poorly written and hammers the cpu even when not in use.

I now have a Canon LIDE 60 which I got brand new off ebay for 25 pounds. This is an excellent scanner, needs no power supply (runs off the USB), making it extremely portable. Software is good, especially the 'scan to PDF' function.

For slides and negs, I used a Nikon ED IV film scanner.

mgilvey
17 November 2006, 05:33 PM
Hi Folks,

This is my first post here so I'll say a great big HOWDY to everyone.

I purchased a very inexpensive scanner several years ago to pair up with my Apple G4 running OS9. It was a UMAX ASTRA 4200 (I think it's the 4200 or is it a 2200?). Anyway, the software it came with was VERY basic. It would give me "a scan" and that's about all I could say for it. The color was way off, it was noisey and just pretty bad in general. This frustrated me because I have run big expensive scanners for prepress shops for many years but I lived with it. Anyway, eventually I purchased a newer Mac and the scanner software would not work with OSX so I had a dead scanner effectively.

This was until I discovered SilverFast Ai (http://www.lasersoft.com). I downloaded a trial version and could not beleive what a great scan I could get out of it! I looked deeper into it and discovered that it gave me virtually drum scanner control from my $99.00 scanner. Very, very good program. I encourage anyone who needs a better scanner, before you change your scanner, change your software. This program will let you control every aspect of color, resolution and density, you can even batch scan!

Hope that helps.

marnen
17 November 2006, 05:35 PM
Those who already have GraphicConverter might like to know that it will do all this as well.

Bob White
19 November 2006, 11:31 PM
...................This was until I discovered SilverFast Ai (http://www.lasersoft.com). I downloaded a trial version and could not beleive what a great scan I could get out of it! I looked deeper into it and discovered that it gave me virtually drum scanner control from my $99.00 scanner. Very, very good program. I encourage anyone who needs a better scanner, before you change your scanner, change your software. This program will let you control every aspect of color, resolution and density, you can even batch scan!...............

Actually, for most of my scanning on both of my scanners, I use a shareware product. It is named VueScan and is superior to any of the average pieces of software that come with the scanners. The author is constantly updating it and will actually answer your emails to him. Check it out at http://www.hamrick.com/