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KTG
13 September 2006, 10:35 AM
I hate to admit ignorance on this, but would some give me an explanation on the meaning of "once removed" as in First Cousin, Once Removed?
Any information on the cousin sequencing, 1st cousin, second cousin and so on. Is there a 3rd cousin? Any links or resources would be helpful

many thanks,

k

KTG
13 September 2006, 10:43 AM
I jumped the gun, found an excellent explanation on Genealogy.com

thanks,

k

Frank
13 September 2006, 10:58 AM
...would some give me an explanation on the meaning of "once removed" as in First Cousin, Once Removed? Any information on the cousin sequencing, 1st cousin, second cousin and so on. Is there a 3rd cousin? Any links or resources would be helpful...There is a diagram and explanation in the Reunion manual that should help. Click the Manual button on the toolbar and search for "removed cousin." Then click the first link that appears: "Relationships, Descendancy and Ascendancy."

Marilynn
13 September 2006, 07:09 PM
I hate to admit ignorance on this, but would some give me an explanation on the meaning of "once removed" as in First Cousin, Once Removed?
Any information on the cousin sequencing, 1st cousin, second cousin and so on. Is there a 3rd cousin? Any links or resources would be helpful

many thanks,

k

I'm copying this from an Appleworks file so I hope it comes through:

Cousins-this is sort of interesting

Cousins and being removed has to do with counting the number
of generations between two people and the common grandparent.
First, though, we must review our "G's."

The common grandparent = X
A grandchild = GC
A great grandchild = GGC
A great great grandchild = GGGC
A great great great grandchild = GGGGC

Now, visualize all of these abbreviations in a row:

X
GC
GGC
GGGC
GGGGC

How many "G's" does a GC and another GC have in common?
The answer is 1. That makes them first (1) cousins.

How many "G's" does a GGGC and another GGGC have in common?
The answer is 3. That makes them third (3) cousins.

How many "G's" does a GC and a GGC have in common?
The answer is 1. So, that puts them in the first cousin category. But,
just like in math where you cross out common numbers and still
have a remainder, you must count the extra "G's." The number of
extra "G's" indicates how many times the cousins are removed.
In this case, there is a remainder of 1. So the relationship
between a GC and GGC is: first cousin, once removed.

How about a GGGGC and a GGC? Remember that the number of
common "G's" tells what kind of cousin it is and the remaining
number of "G's" tell how far removed it is. In this case, there are
2 common "G's" which means the people are second cousins.
With a remainder of 2 "G's" it means they are twice removed.

Let's try a GC and a GGGGGGC. These two people only have one
common "G" between them so they are in the first cousin range.
The remainder of 5 tells us that these first cousins are five times
(5X) removed.


There are also charts in a matrix that show the relationships and they can be found on the Internet.

Marilynn

Betty Eichhorn
14 September 2006, 05:55 PM
I wrote an article for our Brevard Genealogical Society's newsletter which is posted on BGSchool at <http://bgschool.blogspot.com/>

It has a chart in which "you" are one of the descendants.

Betty.

AE Palmer
14 September 2006, 09:38 PM
I hate to admit ignorance on this, but would some give me an explanation on the meaning of "once removed" as in First Cousin, Once Removed?
Any information on the cousin sequencing, 1st cousin, second cousin and so on. Is there a 3rd cousin? Any links or resources would be helpful

many thanks,

k
For anyone wishing to have a nice graphic displaying these relationships, email me back channel: aepalmer AT a-znet DOT com

Bob White
15 September 2006, 04:12 AM
I hate to admit ignorance on this, but would some give me an explanation on the meaning of "once removed" as in First Cousin, Once Removed?
Any information on the cousin sequencing, 1st cousin, second cousin and so on. Is there a 3rd cousin? Any links or resources would be helpful

many thanks,

k
There is an excellent article in the current Everton's Genealogical Helper magazine (July-August 2006 issue) by George Morgan. He is the co-host of the week Genealogy Guys podcast.