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Havilands
12 March 2006, 02:57 PM
I have a family tree chart filled with pictures and maps and blocks of text which is 2 feet high x 15 feet long. I would like to provide my printer with a file that has adequate resolution for printing. Unfortunately the highest quality output I can provide him is a 180 ppi TIFF, and I can't even open that in Photoshop. When I export to graphics file: Tiff, and then try to open that file with Photoshop 7.01, Photoshop tells me it cannot parse the file. Photoshop will open the JPG and PNG files just fine, but they are 72 ppi, and that's just not acceptable. Even 180 ppi is barely acceptable. I would like to provide a 300 ppi file, but that seems to be impossible.

So I opened the Tiff with Graphic Converter 5.8 and the file opens just fine. So is it just that Photoshop doesn't have adequate memory for opening the file? I have 1 gb of RAM on my G4, and Photoshop uses 455 mb of it. But the rest should use a scratch file, right?

I tried re-saving a new Tiff with Graphic Converter but Photoshop wouldn't open that either. I also tried saving a PSD file with Graphic Converter, and Photoshop said the file was not compatible. (Eh?)

So then I went back to Chart and attempted to File : Print : Save as PDF. Starts working... I see the PDF file appear on the desktop... But when it seems to finish the file disappears. No error message, no indication that anything went wrong, but the PDF file is nowhere to be found. My Page Setup has the chart on one single 15'x2' page, but I've had it adjusted to legal sized pages too and that didn't change anything.

Okay so I tried another tactic. I copied the entire contents of the Chart, opened up a new OmniGraffle Pro 3.2.4 canvas, and pasted. This seems to bring OmniGraffle to its knees. I get the spinning color wheel for several minutes at a time, crippling my ability to work. I attempted to save the file and OmniGraffle hard-crashed.

I suppose I can just edit the image using Graphic Converter but I tend to prefer Photoshop as that is the program with which I am most familiar. Actually I may not have to edit the program at all, but I just want to make sure my printer won't have the same difficulties I am having. And is there any chance of distilling a successful PDF chart of this size?

David G. Kanter
12 March 2006, 03:29 PM
I have a family tree chart filled with pictures and maps and blocks of text which is 2 feet high x 15 feet long. I would like to provide my printer with a file that has adequate resolution for printing. Unfortunately the highest quality output I can provide him is a 180 ppi TIFF, and I can't even open that in Photoshop.While I

Havilands
12 March 2006, 05:57 PM
[QUOTE=David G. Kanter]While I

David G. Kanter
12 March 2006, 06:20 PM
What tilted the balance was that PrintMyFamily.com offers lamination... I don't think Heartland does.Neither do I.
The lamination really preserves the chart for a long time, protecting it from liquid spills, marks, wrinkles, etc.Fair enough. I

theKiwi
12 March 2006, 07:16 PM
You can always take one of Tim's charts printed from a Reunion chart file to a Kinkos and have them laminate it for you.

Roger <----- been there, done that.

David G. Kanter
12 March 2006, 07:55 PM
You can always take one of Tim's charts printed from a Reunion chart file to a Kinkos and have them laminate it for you.For what it

Brooks Wilson
14 March 2006, 02:45 PM
Havilands:

180 dpi is plenty for an ink jet print. I work in a small print shop with a large format printer (HP 5000) and 150 dpi @ 50% of size is what we tell our customers to provide us for printing. You might check with your printer. No need to supply more dpi than necessary. It only taxes your and their computers.

Are you using OS 9 or X? If you're using 9, you can try allocating more RAM to Photoshop by clicking on the application icon for Photoshop and go File>Get Info and bumping it up. If you'r using X, then the OS allocates RAM as needed.

I was going to suggest that maybe your version of Photoshop might be causing your problem, but I was able to test out a Family Tree file at work using OS X and Photoshop 7.0.1 and was able to get it open. The G4 does have 2 GB of RAM, though...

Also, call around to different print shops that do large format printing. Most will have at least 38" wide laminate. No worrying about the print wandering. You're right about pricing. If I recall, we charged $2.50/sq.ft. and your poster would come to $75, just to laminate...

If you can get the file to PDF, you can try to rasterize it using Photoshop. Again, find out what DPI your printer needs.

Good luck!

Brooks

Havilands
17 March 2006, 10:15 PM
My thanks for everyone's input. I emailed Heartland but never heard back from them (that's the second time they've not responded to my emails), so unfortunately I have to go with PrintMyFamily.com anyway.

Good thought about laminating elsewhere though. Thing is I tend to be just lazy enough to go the route of least resistance. I'd rather just recieve the chart completely finished, because I then have to quickly mail it back out to my customer, who is anxiously waiting.

I guess the 150 dpi worked well enough last time. I'm still having glitches trying to open my file in Photoshop (OS X, btw). My efforts at printing it to a PDF file also fail -- appears to be a Reunion glitch to me, at least for a chart of this magnitude. I've got 1 gb of SDRAM, that should be enough. And copying and pasting to OmniGraffle seems to be out of the question too. Fortunately my TIFF output will open in Graphic Converter.

I hope Leister upgrades their Chart program quite a bit. I'm very happy with their main Reunion program -- have used it since their very first version.

ttl
17 March 2006, 11:30 PM
My thanks for everyone's input. I emailed Heartland but never heard back from them (that's the second time they've not responded to my emails), so unfortunately I have to go with PrintMyFamily.com anywayI apologize for bringing business on the forum, but we (Heartland Family Graphics) have a record of only one inquiry (March 12th) which was responded to immediately. We take customer service extremely seriously, so if you don't hear back from us in a day, you can assume that an email coming or going got caught by a spam or junk filter or was lost by an ISP. Anyone not hearing back from us should try again because we don't let emails sit around and we very much value your business.

Sorry we weren't able to help you on this one Chris... maybe next time! :)

vanessajw
07 January 2010, 04:38 PM
I have a family tree chart filled with pictures and maps and blocks of text which is 2 feet high x 15 feet long. I would like to provide my printer with a file that has adequate resolution for printing. Unfortunately the highest quality output I can provide him is a 180 ppi TIFF, and I can't even open that in Photoshop. When I export to graphics file: Tiff, and then try to open that file with Photoshop 7.01, Photoshop tells me it cannot parse the file. Photoshop will open the JPG and PNG files just fine, but they are 72 ppi, and that's just not acceptable. Even 180 ppi is barely acceptable. I would like to provide a 300 ppi file, but that seems to be impossible.

So I opened the Tiff with Graphic Converter 5.8 and the file opens just fine. So is it just that Photoshop doesn't have adequate memory for opening the file? I have 1 gb of RAM on my G4, and Photoshop uses 455 mb of it. But the rest should use a scratch file, right?

I tried re-saving a new Tiff with Graphic Converter but Photoshop wouldn't open that either. I also tried saving a PSD file with Graphic Converter, and Photoshop said the file was not compatible. (Eh?)

So then I went back to Chart and attempted to File : Print : Save as PDF. Starts working... I see the PDF file appear on the desktop... But when it seems to finish the file disappears. No error message, no indication that anything went wrong, but the PDF file is nowhere to be found. My Page Setup has the chart on one single 15'x2' page, but I've had it adjusted to legal sized pages too and that didn't change anything.

Okay so I tried another tactic. I copied the entire contents of the Chart, opened up a new OmniGraffle Pro 3.2.4 canvas, and pasted. This seems to bring OmniGraffle to its knees. I get the spinning color wheel for several minutes at a time, crippling my ability to work. I attempted to save the file and OmniGraffle hard-crashed.

I suppose I can just edit the image using Graphic Converter but I tend to prefer Photoshop as that is the program with which I am most familiar. Actually I may not have to edit the program at all, but I just want to make sure my printer won't have the same difficulties I am having. And is there any chance of distilling a successful PDF chart of this size?

I sympathise with the dpi limit of 72dpi, I've just exported a jpeg to send to family who have neither Mac or reunion and at 72, it's barely readable zooming in, when the tree is 7 metres wide and under a 1 metre tall. So I will have to get it printed out sometime from source. Is Reunion going to provide a higher dpi for jpeg export in the future. PDFs are limited in size and won't support large charts of this size I found. Also if Reunion provided a lined grid it would make refining the tree easier, which I have asked for before. Trees of this size are still difficult to handle and with family giving updates editing would be greatly speeded up.

Gregg
13 January 2010, 01:14 PM
I've just exported a jpeg to send to family who have neither Mac or reunion and at 72, it's barely readable zooming in...If the jpeg file is viewed at 100% it should be just as readable as the original chart view in Reunion at 100%....when the tree is 7 metres wide and under a 1 metre tall...A 72 dpi jpg of this chart is about 19800 x 2800 pixels and very cumbersome for someone to view on a computer screen. Doubling the dpi to 144 dpi would make the jpg file almost 40k pixels wide and it wouldn't look any better on screen and be even more difficult to view.

Increasing the dpi really only improves the printing quality.

Is it possible that you're not viewing the jpg file at 100%?

ByronSpoon
13 January 2010, 03:08 PM
I sympathise with the dpi limit of 72dpi, I've just exported a jpeg to send to family who have neither Mac or reunion and at 72, it's barely readable zooming in, when the tree is 7 metres wide and under a 1 metre tall. ... Trees of this size are still difficult to handle and with family giving updates editing would be greatly speeded up.Vanessa, what are you referring to when you say the chart is "barely readable zooming in, when the tree is 7 metres wide and under a 1 metre tall." ?

(1) Do you mean all the boxes in the chart are too tiny to read?
Then as Gregg pointed out in his reply, in your picture viewing program zoom in on the image window until the image is displayed at 100%.

(2) Or do you mean when you zoom in to make the boxes appear larger the printing becomes to pixelated, i.e. too jagged or too blurry?
Then in your picture viewing program you have zoomed in more than 100% and thus created this pixelation. Reduce the magnification back to 100%, i.e., normal size.

(3) Or do you mean that because the chart horizontally spans across too many screen widths, it is too difficult to read because you cannot find your place within the chart?
Well that is a fact of life. If you create a large family tree, then it will become more difficult to find your way around inside the chart because it spans several screen widths and/or heights. If this is a problem then consider pruning your large chart into separate more manageable pieces based on smaller family groupings.

Havilands
15 February 2011, 11:29 PM
Following up on an old thread here, I exported my latest chart directly as PDF and it seems to be fine. I am not sure why I wasn't able to do it several years ago. The chart is still about 15.5 feet long and 3 feet tall, and it's got so much data (family tree, anecdotes, histories, pictures, images and notes) crammed into that space that resolution is very important. But the last chart I printed up with PrintMyFamily (now called Generation Maps) was beautiful, though I had used TIFF. PDF is much preferred.